Germs Guns and Steel Essay

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The Europeans colonized most of America because they saw the land they had available where they could expand their influence on the world. Also, they were able to establish colonies that sent raw materials home which would make them money. Through the analysis of Jared Diamonds video Guns, Germs, and Steel, this essay will show that the Europeans were able to conquer the Native American’s so easily because of their geography, weapons, and diseases.
The advantages from the geography that the Europeans had allowed them to have agriculture and domesticated animals causing complex societies to be developed which lead to the conquering of the Native Americans (Guns, Germs, and Steel Video). The germs and diseases that were exposed to the America’s made the settlement of the land a lot easier. Since the Europeans settlers did not understand the causes of Malaria, they settled by river and water sources where they were exposed to Malaria even more. Also, they all lived close by each other so the epidemics were occurring often and were very deadly to the other settlers (Guns, Germs, and Steel Video).
The Europeans had great agriculture. Since there was rich soil, they were able to harvest a lot. For example, cereal crops like wheat and barley. These were easy to store and also very easy to produce. All you had to do was scatter the seeds around in order to get the plant to start growing. Also, they were very high in calories so it filled you up quickly (Guns, Germs, and Steel Video). There were a lot of different plants to gather. Gathering was a lot easier and effecting than hunting. Most of the gathering was done by women.
Domesticated animals were a way of life to the Europeans. As well as meat, animals could be used for their milk, which was a great source of protein. Also, their hair and skin could be used to make clothes for extra warmth. We know that some other communities that first had domestic animals had cereal crops, and the combination of animals and plants became complementary. Animal dung could have been used for a fertilizer for the cereal crops. Goats and sheep were the first animals to be domesticated and then were followed by other big farm animals. At first, they were all used for their meat, but then they lead to the invention of the plough. The plough allowed farmers to grow more food and feed more people. In other parts of the world, people were never able to use ploughs because they did not have the animals to pull them. The only big domestic animal in other parts of the world was the pig. Even though you were able to get meat from pigs, you were not able to get fur, milk, wool, leather, or hides. Plus, they were not able to be used for muscle power. The Europeans had cows, sheep, goats, horses, buffalo, camels, and many more.
The weapons that the Europeans used had advantages on...

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