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Good And Evil In Dracula By Bram Stoker

753 words - 3 pages

What if in between good and evil did not exist? Where would you stand? Today, it is believed that everyone was born with the slightest bit of evil in them. In the Victorian Era, this theory would be considered very wrong, because one would either be all good, or all evil. In Dracula, by Bram Stoker, good versus evil was symbolised throughout the book as two antithetical forces without an in between. By clearly demonstrating the relationship between the dualistic ideas of intuition versus logic, good characters facing figures comparable to the devil, and symbolism within the natural world, Bram Stoker effectively recounts a “holy war” between the antagonistic forces of good and evil.

Firstly, good and evil was seen throughout the aspect of intuition versus logic of the book. Dr. Seward writes in his diary that, “Yesterday [he] was almost willing to accept Van Helsing’s monstrous ideas; but now they seem to start out lurid before me as outrages on common sense. I have no doubt that he believes it all. I wonder if his mind can have become in any way unhinged. Surely there must be some rational explanation of all these mysterious things.” (174). In the Victorian Era, logic was perceived as good, while intuition was evil and immoral. Dr. Seward writes how he was at first convinced that Lucy was, in fact, a vampire, but later thinks these ideas are outlandish. He is unwilling to accept Van Helsing’s intuition because his thoughts could not be justified by logic, but could be proven merely by beliefs. Similarly, Jonathan has initial feelings about Dracula that he was convinced were wrong as they were not rational thoughts. He writes that, “there is something so strange about this place and all in it that [he] cannot but feel uneasy.” (21). Jonathan, at first, is apprehensive about Dracula and the atmosphere. He senses that something bad will happen, but stays anyway because his logic contradicts his initial uneasy feelings. These examples of intuition opposing logic demonstrate a form of good versus evil in Dracula.

Good and evil was expressed in the various aspects of the natural world, such as light and dark and life and death. Dr. Seward writes that Renfield “fears the thought of being...

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