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Good And Evil In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

1418 words - 6 pages

Good and Evil in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

"Frankenstein" was written by Mary Shelley. She was born in 1797 and
died in 1851. Her parents were also progressive writers, and their
work would have influenced Shelley's work.

"Frankenstein" is written in the gothic horror genre. The idea of
Frankenstein actually came to Mary Shelley in a half waking nightmare.
She herself said,

"When I placed my head on the pillow I did not sleep………

My imagination, unbidden possessed and guided me, gifting the
successive images that arose in my eyes…"

Shelley felt possessed by the novel. She wanted to write a story to
frighten the reader, as she herself has been frightened the night of
the horrific nightmare:

"Oh! If I could only contrive one which would frighten my reader as I
myself had been frightened that night".

She does not just imagine the horror of her story; her imagination is
possessed by this story; just as Frankenstein is possessed by his
horrific activity of making a monster or a new species.

In gothic horror novels there is usually a scary setting, frightening
weather, and a monster or a monstrous character. Frankenstein in this
respect is no different, for instance the first meeting of the monster
and Frankenstein on top of the mountains; there is the lightening; the
monstrous character. But, as the novel goes on, we, as the reader,
discover that there is a difference to this story. There is more than
one monster there is in fact two. Not just the monster himself, who
never gets named, but also his creator Frankenstein he is not a
monster by appearance, but by his actions. He created a monster,
because of him people were murdered and lives wrecked but most ironic
of all is because of his own actions his own life is wrecked. He
became obsessed with making a monster, and then leaves it and tries to
kill it. But it turns out than that this monster ends up controlling
Frankenstein's life, not the other way around.

While Frankenstein is making his monster nothing else matters to him.
He has a thirst for knowledge beyond human knowledge. This is seen as
evil but it is a contrast, as the experiment did not start as evil it
started as eagerness to conquer death, a favour to human beings. But
it did not turn out like that as Frankenstein was driven by ambition
so he did not notice the evil in the experiment. This a contrast as
Walton, at the beginning of the novel, is also driven by ambition to
obtain information that know other human would know.

This story is about morality. It explores different ides of good and
evil. This is shown in the way that the monster's physical appearance
is supposed to be evil as every one runs form him. But we find out
that all he wants is love, someone to love him, and someone for him to
love. So this shows that he has a good...

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