Reasons For Nora Helmer To Stay In Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House

1061 words - 4 pages

In "A Doll House" Ibsen made a very controversial act, by having Nora leave her husband and her family. After first reading the play I thought that what Nora did was the right thing to do. But after thinking about I now realize that wasn't the right thing to do. Yes, Torvald was not the best husband in the world, but Nora should have considered that before she married him. To turn your back on your spouse is one thing, but to turn your back on your children is another. Nora was around in an era were women were looked down upon, not considered equal to men, so it would be hard for her to find a job. If Nora were to leave her Torvald she would have no were to go.
Nora was a doll all of her life, first to her father then to Torvald, if she were to leave more then likely she would just become someone else's doll.
Torvald was not the best husband in the world, but Nora chose to marry him. Nora never really got a chance to know Torvald. Torvald had his eye on Nora from the beginning. So he help her father and for that Nora was grateful, and thus became Mr. & Mrs. Helmer. It sounds like a very romantic story, but little did Nora know what would be in store for her. Torvald treated Nora like she was his child, I guess that is because he took no part in raising his children the he and Nora had together. If Nora would have taken the time to find out if Torvald was the one for her, then maybe it wouldn't have taken her eight years to realize that she never really loved him.
If you are unhappy in your home then you leave your spouse, but you are never to leave your children. Even though Nora never really spent much time with her children she loved them to death. When Nora finally decided to turn her back on Torvald she decided to turn her back on her children as well. It might not have affected the children right away, but eventually it would have. Girls need a women figure to talk to about female things. Not only that but if Nora left and then later on down the road decided to enter back into the children's lives, they might have resentment towards her.
Another reason why Nora shouldn't leave her children is because Torvald may one day decide to remarry. "She needs to be more to her children than an empty figurehead."(Thomas cyberessay.com) The children's new mother might try to take the place of Nora. If she were to succeed, the children might not remember Nora. But on the other hand maybe she wouldn't succeed in taking Nora's place, and that would be very hard on the children as well.
Nora was around at a time when women weren't considered equal to men, so it would be hard for her to get a job, if she could find one at all.
"The mere fact that Nora's well-intentioned action is considered illegal reflects woman's...

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