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Publius And Thomas Paine´S Ideas On Government

873 words - 4 pages

If government was not a necessary evil then how would a government grow? One may believe that in order for government to achieve greater knowledge and prosperity in their own government they must ensure that these necessary evils coexist with government. Contrary to that belief one may say that necessary evil must be done away with, to pursue a complete and perfect government. Although a perfect government is lead to believe as not possible some people think differently, but one who disagrees with the previous statement may agree with Thomas Paine who believes government is an overall evil. Compared to Publius who thinks government is one part evil one part necessary. All of these evils are a part of human nature and government as well.
Publius believes that one’s government is a reflection on human nature (Federalist 51). Also he mentions that “If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary” (Federalist 51). Publius says this in order to make the analogy that we are no angels, therefore we cannot govern ourselves. This is a good example in showing that human nature and human beings have flaws, so something will more than likely go wrong no matter the circumstances. Publius talks about in Federalist 51 that since men are not angels we live in a society where men govern men and when doing that we have to control their power, as to what they can and cannot decide on such as making laws, distributing laws, and deciding who and how said laws are being forced upon. If you do not control the power of the government they will eventually combine all their powers to form a tyranny. Publius believes that in order to encroach this believed power you must let ambition counteract ambition (Federalist 51). Publius knows that there is evil in government, in every government that has been established since the beginning of time. He thinks that we as people should learn to control the necessary evils that our government possesses.
Thomas Paine strongly believes that society and government are not the same; he gives the example of a patron and a punisher. The patron is society and that it supports you, the punisher is government and that is enforces things upon you (Common Sense). Paine also states that “Society in every state is a blessing, but government even in its best state is but a necessary evil in its worst state an intolerable one” (Common Sense). He believes...

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