Great Plains Community Patrol Essay

769 words - 3 pages - globalleague ✓ Expert Reviewed

The quality and experience leaders’ possess inevitably impact the future of any and all companies and/or organizations. Without the basic strong foundation of leadership, a company will experience low retention of employees, problems being able to complete projects and difficulty in communicating among employees and clients. Such as the case with a Colorado security guard and patrol company established in the Denver Metropolitan area in 2002. The company, referred to as Great Plains Community Patrol, LLC was developed by an individual that had some degree of the security guard and patrol services as well as a strong law enforcement background. As the company was developed ideas were discussed to accommodate to the most common problems and weaknesses that existed with current security companies. Great Plains marketing plans was to seek apartment complexes, home owners associations, industrial parks, and commercial properties to patrol.

In order to stand above the other companies offering the same services, the CEO (Chief Operating Officer) developed a company that offered more features than the competition. Each patrol vehicle was equipped with a MDT (Mobile Data Terminal) that allowed patrol logs to be instantly completed on that site. At the conclusion of the shift, those reports could be instantly emailed or faxed from the patrol vehicle to the management office. Each patrol vehicle was equipped with tools to help residents, clients, or employees in the event that they had locked there keys in their vehicles. Along with first aid kits, and digital cameras, into each patrol vehicle. The idea for the digital cameras was to allow the security officer to take photographs of any damage or problems that they found on their patrols then are able to forward the pictures to management so they could fix the problem.

The marketing department was also well constructed by the CEO as the sales materials included flyers, brochures and product description pages with color pictures to catch the attention of the person reviewing the material. The material was all sent to Vista Print to be completed on a professional format instead of materials being printed off a home computer. The CEO also purchased several folders with the companies name embroidered on the front and allowed a place for a business card...

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