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Greek Mythology Is Clearly Explored In Homer's "The Odyssey."

657 words - 3 pages

Greek Mythology is clearly explored in Homer's "The Odyssey." It takes the reader to a place of mythical proportions and exciting tale telling. From the first four books, the reader is introduced to several characters. The most explored character is Odysseus' son Telemachus. The first four books of The Odyssey explain tales of Telemachus' beginning journey to find his father. The purpose of the beginning tale of Telemachus is to foreshadow the future, to describe Odysseus' personality, to understand the history of Odysseus and how he came to be in the situation he is in.Throughout the first four books the story of Orestes' revenge is discussed to Telemachus in every step of his journey. Before his journey was ever to begin, the gods assembled and Zeus remembering the tale of Aegisthus stated; "Ah how shameless-the way these mortals blame the gods. From us alone, they say, come all their miseries, yes, but they themselves, with their own reckless ways, compound their pains beyond their proper share." (I, 78, 36) This statement is given before they make plans to free Odysseus, as if Zeus is preparing to hear pleads of the suitors once their prophecy is fulfilled. With Nestor, he too discusses the tale and glorifies the strong will of Orestes. More importantly he states to Telemachus: "And you, my friend- how tall and handsome I see you now- be brave, you too, so men to come will sing your praises down the years." (III, 113,226) The statement seems to suggest that Telemachus should stay just as strong when in the same situation as Orestes.In following Telemachus through the first four books, the readers also learn about Odysseus' appearance and personality. When Pallas Athena disguises herself as Mentes in King Odysseus' palace, to Telemachus she states: "Uncanny resemblance.... The head, and the fine eyes- I see him now." (I, 84, 240) As Telemachus introduces himself to Nestor as Odysseus' son...

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