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Growing Up And The Changes Of Jem And Scout

548 words - 2 pages

Growing up and the changes of Jem and ScoutThe theme of maturity and formation of personality is one of most important one in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by American author Harper Lee. This is the story about the people of Maycomb city, Alabama which is narrated by six-year-old girl Jean Finch, or Scout as she is usually called in the book.Through Scout's eyes, we enter in the world of 1930s America where Afro-Americans have limited rights and the issue of racism is so wide spread in that times. Her father, Atticus is a local attorney desperately strives to prove the innocence of a black man, Tom Robinson, unjustly accused in the rape. Through all of the obstacles Scout undergoes with her brother ten-year-old Jem Finch and also with their friend Dill. Together they examine the problems of racism, civil rights and prejudice. This series of events shape their character and tell them the truth about human nature.In the beginning of the novel we see Scout and Jem as the children who live without care about adults' problems and have the childish view on life. They create games for instance, to make Boo Radley, their shut-in neighbor, come out from his spooky house. They show their immaturity through thinking that their father should do something that other fathers do, we understand this from the Scout's words, 'Our father didn't do anything. He worked in an office not in a drug store. He was not sheriff or anything that would possibly arouse the admiration of anyone.'In spite of it as Scout and Jem...

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