Hamartia Essay

569 words - 2 pages

HamartiaDana Alyssa J. Macarilay, IV-FIt is a bleak irony; the truth that will set Oedipus -and Thebes- free, is the same truth that will damn him and will cause his people to condemn him. Despite the warnings against his restless pursuit, Oedipus soldiers on, determined to appease his pride and curiosity. Yet, we cannot fault him entirely for this stubbornness - he is not aware that he is the only one left out of the loop. He still thinks that everyone is looking to him for answers and he feels that it is his duty to both his people and himself to find out what that truth is.Putting myself in his shoes, I would do the same as Oedipus did and continue searching for the truth. I would call for anyone who might have the answers to my questions, no matter how many people I might have to send for or threaten with an execution. I am every bit as stubborn, prideful, and intense as Oedipus is - to the point where I can find rationality in his actions. There's no sense in turning back and leaving the question in the air just because a few people have expressed their dissent. In the end, I value my contentment over their counsel.I share Oedipus' hamartia; hastiness in actions, and a penchant for being carried away by emotions. I would search for truth the way Oedipus did, and in the end, condemn myself to the same fate he succumbed to. I am fuelled by my curiosity, and propelled by this belief: any other course of action would be that of only a coward's. Cowardice has no place amidst greatness, and greatness is attributed only to the heroes. In the same way...

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