Hamlet Invisible Man Essay

1437 words - 6 pages

Female and male are two fundamental sectors of humanity. Anima and animus are psychologist Carl Jung’s way to describe the feminine and masculine halves of the personality. Just like the ambiguity of gender orientation, anima and animus coexist within the individuals of the global population. The blurred border between these subdivisions implements the need to search for . In Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and Ellison’s Invisible Man, the feminine character traits of the protagonists are alluded to as the cause of their failures, which supports the idea that the inward battle between masculinity and femininity exist as the characters journey closer to their identity.
“It has been generally believed that males stand as opposed to females physically, intellectually, and emotionally. Man is supposed to be strong, courageous, rational and sexually aggressive; while woman is weak, timid, emotional, and sexually passive.” (Guo 2009) The aforementioned beliefs sprout from the deceptively repetitive statistics that male is the dominant gender. However, the audience of “Hamlet” encounters the similar idea of inept femininity through Hamlet’s struggle to accept his indecisiveness, that causes the delay of his father’s revenge, an action in which he has “cause, and will, and strength, and means,/ To do’t. Examples gross as earth exhort” (Hoy 1992). In the renowned soliloquy “to be or not to be”, Hamlet explicitly designated his excessive thinking as the seed to his inaction:
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pitch and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry
And lose the name of action. (1992)
Even though the concept on gender identity holds that thinking is a masculine trait. “The tragic flaw of Hamlet is his love of thinking” (Guo 2009), his womanish tendency to responds passionately to every occasion regardless of its relevance toward him. “From the death of his father, the overhasty marriage of his mother, to the concern about the rivalry between children’s performing company and the adult actors, from the virtue of woman to the art of performance, from Claudius revelry to the grave digging of the two clowns.” (2009) In short, Hamlet’s mind never stops working. His dialogues are majorly infested with unraveled philosophies and understandings of the essence of human life: “the whips and scorns of time / Th’ oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely / The pangs of disprized love, the law’s delay / The insolence of office, and the spurns / That patient merit of th’unworthy takes.” (Hoy 1992) However abundant, these reasoning do not dissolve into a solution, but rather, they project shadows upon Hamlet’s determination to avenge by glazing his lenses with a pessimistic perception of life. As a result, Hamlet questions the necessity of killing Claudius and fails to settle the revenge accordingly to his father’s...

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