Hamlet Soliloquy Essay

749 words - 3 pages

To Be or Not To Be Analysis"To be, or not to be"(III. 1. 57) is one of the most famous lines in William Shakespeare's play, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. In the soliloquy of Act III scene one, Hamlet juggles around the idea of life or death. Hamlets soliloquy lays out his conception on whether he shall continue to live miserably or commit suicide. The soliloquy also reveals one of Hamlet's fears. Hamlet's monologue creates strong visualizations of his options "To be or not to be" (III. 1. 57).In this soliloquy, Hamlet is flustered and ponders the idea of committing suicide. Why is hamlet confused and thinking about committing suicide? Hamlet is overwhelmed about the news of his father's death he has heard from the Ghost. He is baffled on whether to continue struggling through his misfortune or to contest against his troubles in life, specifically the revenge to justify his father. "The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles, and by opposing end them?" (III. 1. 58-60). This quote is an implied comparison of Hamlet asking himself if he should continue to suffer by all the wrongs that he speculates as "outrageous fortune" (III. 1. 58 ) or to put up a fight against his miseries. Hamlet then starts to think death may resolve all of his issues. Hamlet compares death to sleep, "and by a sleep to say we end the heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks." (III. 1. 61-62). Therefore if he were to sleep all of his "heart-ache" (III. 1. 62) problems would wash away.Hamlet then begins to consider that if one were to die, "to sleep" (III. 1. 60), there are possibilities of dreams. In other words just because one is dies physically, does not mean he or she will rest peacefully. As Hamlet's metaphors begin to unfold so does his identity. There is a sense of fear lingering as Hamlet starts to discuss the chance of struggle after death. Though Hamlet is only weighing out his options "to be or not to be" (III. 1. 57), he begins mentally to steer away from the suicide considerations due to the unknown outcomes after death. "for in that sleep of death what dreams may come when we have shuffled?" (III. 1....

Find Another Essay On Hamlet Soliloquy

The Soliloquies of Shakespeare's Hamlet - To be or not to be Soliloquy

2362 words - 9 pages The “To be or not to be” Soliloquy in Hamlet       One soliloquy stands out above the others in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Of the seven soliloquies by the protagonist, the “To be or not to be” soliloquy is universally recognized as superior to the others. This essay considers this most famous soliloquy.   Marchette Chute in “The Story Told in Hamlet” describes just how close the hero is to suicide while reciting his most famous

Soliloquies of Shakespeare's Hamlet - The To be or not to be Soliloquy

2085 words - 8 pages Hamlet -- the “To be or not to be” Soliloquy         In William Shakespeare’s dramatic tragedy Hamlet the fourth of the seven soliloquies by the hero is generally considered exceptional and more famous than the others. This essay will examine and analyze this soliloquy, and explore the reasons for its fame.   This famous soliloquy manifests the expression of very deep and conflicting emotions. Ruth Nevo in “Acts III and IV

Soliloquy Term Paper: Hamlet’s Soliloquies

3441 words - 14 pages Hamlet’s Soliloquies        Reading Shakespeare’s Hamlet, it seems that at every other turn in the narrative the prince is alone and uttering another soliloquy. What is the nature of his various soliloquies? How many are there? What are their contexts? This essay will answer these questions and more. John Russell Brown in “Soliloquies and Other Wordplay Let the Audience Share Some of Hamlet’s Thoughts” explains that soliloquies are but

Soliloquy Essay - Hamlet's First Three Soliloquies

2141 words - 9 pages , complete. These occurrences comprise Hamlet's soliloquies, and each reveals succinctly and powerfully Hamlet's state of mind as each soliloquy is delivered throughout the play.   "O that this too too solid flesh would melt" is Hamlet's utterance of requested suicide to initiate his first soliloquy.  Suicide is only unattainable for Hamlet in lieu of his intense personal piety: if he commits suicide, he will surely

Soliloquies Essay - The Meaning of Hamlet’s Soliloquy

1146 words - 5 pages The Meaning of Hamlet's Soliloquy               "To be or not to be that is the question"  (III.i l 56)   This is one of the most often recited lines in all the works of Shakespeare. However, very few people have any idea of its the true meaning. While the phrase sounds simply intelligent, and philosophical, it is important to explore the meaning it holds in the play. The speech in its entirety reveals that Hamlet is considering his

Moral Doubt in Hamlet's Soliloquy - To be or not to be...

540 words - 2 pages The Moral Question in Hamlet's Soliloquy - To be or not to be... "The major question in 'To be or not to be' cannot be suicide. If it were, as many have noted, it would be dramatically irrelevant. Hamlet is no longer sunk in the depths of melancholy, as he was in his first soliloquy. He has been roused to action and has just discovered how to test the Ghost's words. When we last saw him, only five minutes before, he was anticipating the

Soliloquies Essay - Importance of the First Soliloquy in Macbeth

1484 words - 6 pages Importance of the First Soliloquy in Macbeth        Following king Duncan's arrival at Inverness, Macbeth delivers his first major soliloquy. This speech summarizes his reasons for not wanting to commit murder. It is also an image of the plot of Macbeth, as it foreshadows the chain of events that is to follow the murder of Duncan. Although Macbeth knows that he cannot "trammel up the consequence" of Duncan's murder

Critical Analysis of Shakespeare's Hamlet

676 words - 3 pages purpose. He asserts that the only reason people endure their horrible lives is the uncertainty of what lies after death. "Who would fardels bear, to grunt and sweat under a weary life, but that the dread of something after death..." Is it noble to suffer, and is life worth all its misery? Hamlet must question himself to discover the answers. At the point in Hamlet when this famous soliloquy takes place, Hamlet has many reasons to be

Hamlets Revenge

1141 words - 5 pages The Revenge of Hamlet Hamlet’s sixth soliloquy is full of irony, philosophy, and with the familiar subject of revenge. It reflects themes of the entire play, and it helped further my understanding of Shakespeare’s masterpiece, Hamlet. The main character, in his second-to-last monologue reflects Claudius’ regret which is an obstacle to revenge. This barrier creates frustration for Hamlet, but also is a reason for further procrastination, which

Analysis of Ophelia from Hamlet

5064 words - 20 pages character will be illuminated by explaining both soliloquies and finally Hamlet himself. "To be, or not to be, that is the question," (Beaty, 1348) is one of the most famous and well known excerpts from the play "Hamlet." What most people do not realize is the significance it has in the portrayal of the character Hamlet. During this soliloquy Hamlet is debating his fate. Hamlet is asking himself whether it is more noble, in the

Hamlet's Transformation from Good to Evil in the Play Hamlet by William Shakespeare

931 words - 4 pages true thoughts and character to be revealed through his soliloquies, which are reviewed and discussed throughout this essay. In his first soliloquy, Hamlet reveals his wishes that he could just melt away and be no more, with death comes relief from this world, but he beliefs that suicide is immoral and that the whole business of the world is useless and unprofitable. Hamlet reflects on the greatness of his father and how the leadership went from

Similar Essays

Soliloquy And Revenge In Hamlet Essay

721 words - 3 pages Soliloquy and Revenge in Hamlet       The soliloquy is a literary device that is employed to unconsciously reveal an actor's thoughts to the audience. In William Shakespeare's, Hamlet, Hamlet's soliloquy in Act II, ii, (576-634) depicts his arrival at a state of vengeful behaviour through an internal process. Hamlet moves through states of depression and procrastination as he is caught up in the aftermath of the murder of his father

The Use Of Soliloquy In Shakespeare's Hamlet

1150 words - 5 pages a character from a soliloquy than from the action of the play alone. Shakespeare uses the soliloquies in ‘Hamlet’ to great effect; with Hamlet’s state of mind, his indecision and his use of imagery. Hamlet’s state of mind in his first soliloquy is deeply nihilistic; Shakespeare presents the world as an ‘unneeded garden’, ‘rank in nature’. In the first soliloquy and

Soliloquies Of Shakespeare's Hamlet Hamlet's Third Soliloquy

978 words - 4 pages Hamlet's Third Soliloquy     One of Shakespeare's most celebrated works is the play The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. Hamlet, the main character, endures many of the misfortunes of life that the average - and not-so average - person might suffer. Hamlet's father dies a suspicious death and his mother hastily remarries, he bears the trauma of a lost relationship with a girl he seems to truly love, realizes the truth

The Soliloquies Of Shakespeare's Hamlet To Be Or Not To Be Soliloquy

2362 words - 9 pages The “To be or not to be” Soliloquy of Hamlet       Does the hero in Shakespeare’s Hamlet deliver a soliloquy that does not fit the dramatic context? Does the soliloquy suggest that suicide is imminent? This essay proposes to answer these and other questions relevant to the “To be or not to be” soliloquy.   Lawrence Danson in the essay “Tragic Alphabet” discusses the most famous of soliloquies as involving an “eternal dilemma