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Hate Crimes, Racism, And Prejudice Examined In The Museum Of Tolerance

1103 words - 5 pages

The Museum of Tolerance is a museum that examines hate-crimes around the world caused by racism and prejudice. The museum focuses mainly on the history of Holocaust, out of all hate crimes in the world. However, when digging through the museum, the Museum of Tolerance appeared to be biased in a way with their portrayal of many images.
The formal title of the museum is the Museum of Tolerance. They chose this title, because they want to promote tolerance and understanding of hate crimes in our schools and communities. Instead of naming their museum, “Museum of Tolerance”, they could have chosen the title, “Remembering The Holocaust”, since the museum mainly focuses on the Holocaust.
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The museum also appeared to have an anti Muslim sentiment. Their gallery showed many video clips of hate crimes done by the Muslims. In those clips, it showed many Muslims protesting and shouting, “Kill all Jews” and Islamic extremists terrorizing everyone in the world. This wasn’t just shown in one section of the gallery, but also in many other sections. Even though there are few Islamic terrorists, I know for a fact from the class reading, (Why Are There So Many Muslim Terrorists? By Christopher Bates), that there aren’t a lot of Muslim terrorists in reality. The way the museum portrayed the Muslims kind of looked as if they were stereotyping the Muslims and that they are the cause of hate crimes.
Further inside the museum, they had like a time machine simulator where it took you to the past during the rise and fall of Nazi Germany. This really made me see and feel what it was like back then, which is way better than just reading or listening about it from someone else. Even though the museum has this cool feature, I think the museum is a bit worse in a way since they are biased. They make it look like as if Jews were the only victims of the Holocaust. There were many victims of the Holocaust who weren’t Jews. Many homosexuals were also Nazi’s targets during the Holocaust.
The museum taught us that the power of words can lead to terrorism and that we tend to allow hatred to continue because it’s much easier to ignore than confront the issue. These were demonstrated during the time machine simulator along with some blame. For example, the simulator showed that when Hitler took power and made Nazi Germany, he continued to invade other countries and performed many crimes against the Jews. The simulator was telling us that these could have been prevented only if Britain and France confronted the Nazis ahead of time. The way this was mentioned was more in a blameful tone.
Additionally, the museum seems to have pro-American views since they did not mention a thing about the U.S. not taking any actions ahead of time as discussed in class. Instead they made America look like the only ones that helped saved the world, even though Russia,...

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