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Hatred In Societies Like The One Described In George Orwell´S 1984

954 words - 4 pages

Philosophers around the world enthusiastically debate society and its changes, how it can survive and how to mold it. Society, by definition, is the totality of social relationships among humans; never are the words happiness, love, or hatred hinted at. Without the knowledge of any emotions they cannot be felt. A society can survive on hatred, power, and victory with the exception of love and devotion for its leader(s).
If there is no experience with love there can be no knowledge of its existence. Love for a dictator/ leader is more of a detrimental devotion rather than the passionate, lusty love that marriage provokes. Although there is little known about North Korea, in the documentary ...view middle of the document...

Winston is only too eager to help. His rebellious mind is not looking for love or happiness, quite the contrary. He wants to be a part of a society that hates just as much as his current predicament does. Instead of hating the Brotherhood and the enemies of the country he wants to hate Big Brother. There is no happiness or love in Oceania, his country, yet the society still moves forward like a tank into war.
Safety is a key role in any society and growing hatred, if it is wanted, can plague the lands. If citizens feel safe they are willing to trust and with that trust comes power. In Germany, just before World War II, Adolf Hitler came into power hoping to give worldly power back to Germany when he said, “When I take charge of Germany, I shall end tribute abroad and Bolshevism at home,” (No Room for the Alien, No Need for the Wastrel, George Sylvester). The Germans liked the idea and granted Hitler the amount of power he desired. His entire society, the Nazi Party, was run on hate for those who did not possess the ultimate features required for the supreme race and devotion to his ideology. Hitler’s party members felt safe and therefore gave him power to do with as he pleased and allowed him to make rules and laws that required love for no one except their leader and themselves. Like Hitler, the government and figurehead, Big Brother, in 1984, falsifies facts and production rates. Winston changes numbers and rates as described, “For example, the Ministry of Plenty’s forecast had estimated the output of boots for the quarter to be at one hundred and forty-five million pairs. The actual output was sixty-two million pairs. Winston, however,...

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