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Health Care In The United States

830 words - 4 pages

The United States is portrayed as having one of the best health care systems in the world. However, health care is the industry that is affecting the lives of most Americans daily. As a result, more than 40 million people have no health insurance in the United States, which is primarily due to issues with access, cost, and quality and coordination of health care among various populations (Starfield, 2000).
Essentially, the dream is for everyone to have health coverage in the United States. Access, cost, and quality and coordination of health care have been the hot topic for decades now. It has been the topic for change, a change that can finally be fulfilled due to the Patient ...view middle of the document...

I have actually had the opportunity to volunteer in Detroit, Michigan for one year at a free clinic for the uninsured and underinsured. The patients were very grateful for the clinic being open since they were turned away from other practices that required health insurance. The patients basically received the primary care and health education that was lacking and referrals to Henry Ford hospital for further treatments and/or surgeries free of cost.
Now, according to Goodson, the PPACA has the potential to reestablish primary care as the foundation for the United States health care delivery by millions of people gaining access to health care (Goodson, 2010). The reestablishment of primary care will ultimately increase the physician workforce, increase the quality of care, and establish a national commission for ensuring that there are adequate numbers of health care workers with the right skill set. It seems like a win-win in regards to employment and access to health care. In addition, Koh and Sebelius stated that the PPACA will promote prevention, health and wellness, and prevent disease (Koh & Sebelius, 2010). The promotion of preventive care will help reduce the cost of health care by private health insurances and Medicare offering certain preventive services for free. I feel as though the act will allow everyone to seek care at least once per year, which can potentially relieve the financial burden to some of the population. The...

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