Healthcare Reform In The United States

2909 words - 12 pages

For decades, one of the many externalities that the government is trying to solve is the rising costs of healthcare. "Rising healthcare costs have hurt American competitiveness, forced too many families into bankruptcy to get their families the care they need, and driven up our nation's long-term deficit" ("Deficit-Reducing Healthcare Reform," 2014). The United States national government plays a major role in organizing, overseeing, financing, and more so than ever delivering health care (Jaffe, 2009). Though the government does not provide healthcare directly, it serves as a financing agent for publicly funded healthcare programs through the taxation of citizens. The total share of the national publicly funded health spending by various governments amounts to 4 percent of the nation's gross domestic product, GDP (Jaffe, 2009). By 2019, government spending on Medicare and Medicaid is expected to rise to 6 percent and 12 percent by 2050 (Jaffe, 2009). The percentages, documented from the Health Policy Brief (2009) by Jaffe, are from Medicare and Medicaid alone. The rapid rates are not due to increase of enrollment but growth in per capita costs for providing healthcare, especially via Medicare.
New Proposal
During the study of various reforms that were proposed and denied, both the GOP and Democrats attempted to find a balance that would guarantee the success of their proposals. Years of research, growing ideologies, political views and disregard for the country's constitution sparked an array of alternatives to solve the country's healthcare spending. The expenditure of US healthcare dollars was mostly due to hospital reimbursements, which constitute to 30% (Longest & Darr, 2008). During the research for alternatives, the group looked into placing a mandate on illegal immigrants that do not have insurance because of their status. It would require healthcare providers, mainly hospitals, to record the amount of reimbursements they receive for treating illegal immigrants. Upon further research, Leighton Ku's (2009) study proves immigrants, legal or illegal, constitutes two-thirds less of the country's healthcare expenditures than native-born Americans. Yet, this alternative received a unanimous denial because of Ku's research. One of the current alternatives proposed was "Mitt's Plan" by former candidate Mitt Romney. Romney's plan included turning the state's free healthcare pool to an insurance program for the working poor (Bebinger, 2012). Putting this act into play would create coverage at a reasonable price for those citizens previously not covered due to lack of finances.

The imposed issue between all these alternatives is the individual mandate. The individual mandate is included in Obama’s Affordable Health Care Act, and requires all persons to obtain health insurance. Other alternatives have risen to modify the Affordable Care Act. The hope we have for our nation is to provide healthcare that does not conflict with religious...

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