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Hemingway's A Farewell To Arms Essay

1791 words - 7 pages

A Farewell To ArmsIn this study, I will make a comparison between the book version of “ A Farewell to Arms” which is one of the well known novels of Ernest Hemingway and the film version of it. Sometimes I will make some criticism on the film and highlight some points that are different from the book because the film version has to be bounded to the original form and it should refer directly to the book. So I will explain each of my comparisons in detail to make the difference more visible.First of all, Hemingway is a war time writer. He experienced the atmosphere of war in his real life and it effected him in many ways . When we look at the post war era, we see that the writers of that time have focused on the things such as alcohol, loss of American ideals, loss of hope, self exile, self destruction, and pessimism. It is not difficult to see that all of these themes are the reflections of the war on writers’ psychology and works. What they produced were directly related to the war time. The years immediately after World War I brought a highly vocal rebellion against established social, sexual, and aesthetic conventions and a vigorous attempt to establish new values. Most of the writers went to Europe, living mostly in Paris as expatriates. They willingly accepted the name “ lost generation.” Out of their disillusion and rejection, the writers built a new literature, impressive in the glittering1920s and the years that followed. So, lost Generation refers to a group of American literary notables who lived in Paris and other parts of Europe from the time period which saw the end of World War I to the beginning of the Great Depression Era. Ernest Hemingway was one of them. Everything he experienced was a tool for him to use in his productions. By preparing my paper on this issue, I also want to underline how he is a mirror of his time and his own psychology in that time. I’m going to analyse the book in relation to the film of it and will find out remarkable differences of two versions.First of all, the most remarkable difference I noticed when I watced the film was the “love” theme in the film. The love of Catherine and Henry was emphasized too much in the film and I watched it as I was watching a love movie. But in the book, the scenes from the war were reflected to the reader in some chapters and they were too realistic. While watching the movie I waited for the moments of war’s bloody atmosphere because it was a war period’s production but I was disappointed. Other than this, lots of details were also changed or removed in movie version. For instance the meeting of Catherine and Henry was in the hospital. Ferguson and Rinaldi were also with them in the book but in film they met at a party and nobody introduce them to each other. When Henry saw Catherine alone, he went near her and they knew each other. Another detail I noticed was the Priest issue. In many chapters of the book, we read lots of...

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