Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House Essay

963 words - 4 pages

What comes to mind when the word morals is said? Whose morals should be followed, individual or group? In A Doll House, Ibsen portrays the protagonist, Nora, to follow the morals of her husband, Torvald. Four key aspects that help Nora decide to change her mind and make a decision to leave Torvald. These include the constant change of nicknames, the questioning of her own independence, the questioning of Torvald's love, and the realization that Torvald loves his reputation more then herself. As a result, Nora sets out to find her own individuality and moral beliefs.

When it comes to the use of nicknames, the tone of voice is an indication of how a person feels about another. As the story begins, we find Nora and Torvald in somewhat of a sarcastic yet loving conversation involving nicknames and money. Nora has just returned from Christmas shopping when Torvald asks, "Is that my squirrel rummaging around? (Kirszner, 1186) He then goes on to say, "Has the little spendthrift been out throwing money around again? 1186). I believe that the first key aspect of Nora deciding to leave is Torvalds constant change of nicknames towards her. He appears to have a hard time recognizing what Nora resembles to him: a greedy money spender, a beautiful songbird, or a pest rummaging around. Nicknames can be used in a good and a bad way. If said in a sarcastic way the interpretation can be taken incorrectly and leave the person feeling hurt. However, if it is said in a calm and normal voice the person can feel the sincerity and recognizes that it is meant out of love.

As the story goes on, Nora's friend, Mrs. Linde arrives and Nora begins to question her own independence. Mrs. Linde's husband has died and she has come asking for a favor, a job. Nora and Mrs. Linde get into a conversation about how their lives have been over the past nine or ten years. As their conversation grows deeper, a smaller argument begins to form. They begin talking about burdens that each one has dealt with and Mrs. Linde states, .".. you know so little of life's burdens yourself" (1192). Nora, taking offense, replies, "You're just like the others. You all think I'm incapable of anything serious" (1193). This is the second piece of evidence because Mrs. Linde helps Nora to begin realizing that she has not been as independent as she thought. Nora starts to apprehend that she has been sheltered her whole life and does not know what it means to be independent or to have her own set of morals. She begins to question what she believes in and what others have her believing in.

As Mrs. Linde...

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