"Henry Purcell" By Gerard Manley Hopkins.

1290 words - 5 pages

'Henry Purcell' by Gerard Manley Hopkins is a sonnet. This is so, as it begins with two quatrains, which describe the musician from whom the poem takes its name, followed by a sestet that takes a closer look at the music that he (Henry Purcell) created. However, a sonnet is usually defined as fourteen lines written in iambic pentameter, and the poem 'Henry Purcell' has six iambic feet per line, and as a result it is a sonnet in Alexandrines. A poem such as this usually includes a caesura, and this is no exception, with the caesura coming in line seven between 'feature' and 'finds'. It does not have a readily recognisable rhyme scheme, but makes use of sprung rhythm in a number of instances.There are a great number of poetic devices that Hopkins uses throughout this poem. Alliteration is perhaps the most widely used of these, and if the poem were to be rewritten in prose form the effect of this would be lost. Other similar devices that would disappear if the poem were to be written out in prose form would be the use of archaic language (and other unusual vocabulary), repetition, parallelism, run-on lines, syntax and imagery. These aspects are discussed as they appear in the poem while this essay progresses.The first line of the poem introduces two of these elements. 'Have fair fallen, O fair, fair have fallen' includes much repetition and alliteration, which we see permeating the poem throughout. Alliteration of the fricative 'f' in this sentence creates a quiet, reflective and ponderous atmosphere that continues over the two quatrains, and into the two three-line stanzas. There is also a great deal of repetition in this first line. The word 'fair' is repeated, as is the entire phrase 'Have fair fallen' in a slightly altered word order. This parallelism emphasises the importance of the statement that Hopkins is making - that he hopes 'fair' fortune has be-'fallen' Purcell. The meaning of this first line is continued on throughout the first stanza, and this is evidenced by the presence of a run-on line at the end of each of the first three lines of the quatrain -the first stanza is basically one long sentence. The continuity leant to the first stanza through the use of run-on lines is similarly given to the second quatrain which follows the same format, and the final two three-line stanzas are linked together as such as well.Further evidence of parallelism in the first stanza can be seen in the third line, where 'since' is repeated. Similarly, alliteration of 'l' and 'h' in the final line of the first quatrain is also evident. Both of these poetic devices are used to a similar effect as mentioned above. The gist of the first quatrain is Hopkins expressing his hope that Henry Purcell is not damned due to his protestant background, as he holds him in such high regard, and that the condemnation in which he (Purcell) be reversed due to his good intentions (Gardner, 1985).In the second quatrain, Hopkins employs many of the devices he used in the first....

Find Another Essay On "Henry Purcell" by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

Compare and Contrast of‘‘Binsey Poplars’’ by Gerard Manley Hopkins and ‘‘The Trees’’ by Philip Larkin

2136 words - 9 pages Choose two of the poems given in the handout . Compare and contrast these two poems (‘‘Binsey Poplars’’ by Gerard Manley Hopkins and ‘‘The Trees’’ by Philip Larkin), paying close attention to their language and form. In a recent article in The Guardian, Billy Mills writes, ‘Trees have been putting down roots in poetry for centuries’, and indeed there are as many poems about trees as there are species of trees themselves. As someone who grew

Analysis of the Poem The Wreck of Deutschland by Gerard Manley Hopkins

2349 words - 9 pages will for England. Gerard Manley Hopkins, himself, is the speaker of the poem, “The Wreck of the Deutschland.” In this poem, Hopkins is horrified by the news of the five Franciscan nuns who tragically drowned in the shipwreck of the steamship, Deutschland, trying to escape from the anti-Catholic Falk Laws, seeking refuge in New York in America. Hopkins is horrified because he couldn’t understand why God would cast their deaths in the shipwreck

Faith and Doubt in the Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins

1621 words - 6 pages Gerard Manley Hopkins had eight siblings and was born of Manley and Catherine Smith Hopkins. His parents were Anglicans that followed the Catholic tradition in sacraments and papacy. By instilling the theological values, faith and morals into Gerard, he became heavily influenced by his family. His parents taught him, as well as their other children to love God. Gerard guaranteed his mother that he would strengthen his connection with God and

Allusions to God in the Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins

1765 words - 7 pages bird, the blooming of a flower, the birth of a human, all emit energy. They all take their toll on this planet, but each and every one was planned for and built for a purpose by our Heavenly Father. Gerard Manley Hopkins’ message is that all things are meaningless less without God. (Chevigny) He frequently utilized symbols to demonstrate how God is evident in all living things. He coined the term instress, to explain the experience that comes

Rhythm and Dictions in Gerard Manley Hopkins' "Spring and Fall"

1538 words - 6 pages leaves whirling in the strong gusts of wind. By depicting the sound of the wind and the rustling leaves, Hopkins puts the readers in the scene, which further integrate the poem's effect on the readers.In "Spring and Fall", Gerard Manley Hopkins uses rhythm, word choice, and alliteration to make his poem come alive to his readers. He uses his innovation of sprung rhythm in contrast to the straightforward, sing-song rhythm to demonstrate the phase of

A Comparison of The Poplar Field by William Cowper and Binsey Poplars Felled 1879 by Gerard Manley Hopkins

1439 words - 6 pages A Comparison of The Poplar Field by William Cowper and Binsey Poplars Felled 1879 by Gerard Manley Hopkins The first thing that is noticeable is that both the poems are about a group of trees alongside a river. The other general similarity between the poems is that they are then later cut down and so the writers are now deprived of their enjoyment in the "cool colonnade". However there are many differences between the

Lesson Plan: Students work in large and small groups to analyze and discuss the poem "Spring and Fall:To a Young Child," by Gerard Manley Hopkins

1117 words - 4 pages RationaleStudents will be able to explain the terms figurative language, neologism, simile, and metaphor. After understanding the terms in isolation, students will be encouraged to locate these literary concepts within the context of the poem "Spring and Fall: To a Young Child," by Gerard Manley Hopkins. The instructor will then gently guide students through the poem using Socratic questioning so that they may imbue the poem with inter

"The Way Through the Woods" by Gerald Manley Hopkins and "Binsey Poplars" by Rudyard Kipling

1757 words - 7 pages Compare the two poets' representations of and attitudes to nature in 'The Way Through the Woods' and 'Binsey Poplars'.-----------------------------------------------------------These two poems, by Gerald Manley Hopkins and Rudyard Kipling respectively, are both concerned with how humans and how their presence among nature can have a negative effect. Both of these poems seem to agree that humans do have an influence on the natural evolution of

Analysis of the Poem The Wreck of Deutschland by Gerald Manley Hopkins

868 words - 3 pages God’s will for England. Gerard Manley Hopkins, himself, is the speaker of the poem, “The Wreck of the Deutschland.” In this poem, Hopkins is horrified by the news of five Franciscan nuns who tragically drowned in the shipwreck of the steamship Deutschland, trying to escape from the anti-Catholic Falk Laws, seeking refuge in New York. Hopkins is horrified because he couldn’t understand why God would cast their deaths in the shipwreck since they

Gerard Nanley Hopkins’ Poem God’s Grandeur

595 words - 2 pages Gerard Nanley Hopkins’ Poem “God’s Grandeur” Gerard Nanley Hopkins’ poem “God’s Grandeur”, illustrates the relationship connecting man and God. Hopkins uses alliteration and stern tone to compliment the religious content of this morally ambitious poem. The poem’s rhythm and flow seem to capture the same sensation of a church sermon. The diction used by Hopkins seems to indicate a condescending attitude towards society.      The first

Depression in Hopkins' Sonnets of Desolation

1192 words - 5 pages Depression in Hopkins' Sonnets of Desolation        Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) was, first and foremost, a man of the cloth. He seems to have set his gifts in musical composition, drawing, and poetry at a distant second to his ecclesiastical duties for most of his life, causing him to experience terrible bouts of depression. Hopkins poured out this depression in what are known as the Sonnets of Desolation, including "I wake and feel

Similar Essays

Carrion Comfort By Gerard Manley Hopkins

3542 words - 14 pages Carrion Comfort by Gerard Manley Hopkins Gerard Manley Hopkins was a talented poet, and he was also extremely devoted to his faith. He used his poetry as an avenue in which to express his love and praise to his Creator, and many of his poems are beautiful hymns of adoration. “Carrion Comfort,” however, is one of his “terrible sonnets.” Hopkins not only wrote about the beautiful part of faith, but also the questioning and suffering that

Gerard Manley Hopkins Essay

737 words - 3 pages Gerard Manley Hopkins Gerard Manley Hopkins is a reflection of his time period because his work represents realism, his work was different from what was expected, and his work had to do with religion. Although Hopkins is considered as one of the great poets of the past, he was not that appreciated during his time period. The only reason that we have his work today is because his friends held on to his work after his death and decided to

Poetry Explication Of "Spring & Fall", By Gerard Manley Hopkins

911 words - 4 pages The poem "Spring and Fall" by Gerard Manley Hopkins is a poem focusing on the brevity of life, and the grief that is felt in the hearts of all mankind throughout our lives. It is also about the sadness felt by humans as we see ourselves aging, and ultimately about the fact that sin and separation from God bring sorrow and sadness that can never be fully explained by man.The poet is seemingly speaking to a young child, Margaret, who in her

Attitude And Appreciation Of The Natural World In Gerard Manley Hopkins And Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Poetry

1822 words - 7 pages the world around us. Such findings are present in the work of many poets - namely Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844 - 1889)and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1808 - 1882). Hopkins and Longfellow were two contemporary poets from the nineteenth century from different cultures, English and American respectively who relished in the gift of nature with all her attributes. Both of their work is characterised by a deep and personal