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Analysis Of The Invisible Man

1511 words - 7 pages

Never fitting in, the invisible man has learned to conquer his surroundings and finally lead a life for himself. He thought that by moving to the North he would no longer be suppressed because of the color of his skin. Unfortunately things didn't change much for the narrator, so he decided to make another change in his life. He decided to become invisible. With this change, he went from trying to fit in to being able to do whatever he wants. Instead of taking the harsh words and racist actions, he finally could stick up for himself. This novel isn't a story of vengeance, but a story of accepting yourself when no one else does.
The narrator is an African American man from the South during the 1920s. During the novel, many details are kept from the reader. He never reveals his name, along with the name of his college, the state he is from and other personal details. By keeping these details hidden, the narrator is even more invisible to his audience. Yet, he explains that being visible requires people to see you. Whether they see you good or bad, if they notice you, then you are not invisible. Without people not noticing him, the narrator feels lost. This quotation from the prologue explains the struggle he experiences because he is invisible:
Or again, you often doubt if you really exist. You wonder whether you aren’t simply a phantom in other people’s minds. Say, a figure in a nightmare, which the sleeper tries with all his strength to destroy. It’s when you feel like this that, out of resentment, you being to bump people back. And, let me confess, you feel that way most of the time. You ache with the need to convince yourself that you do exist in the real world, that you’re part of all the sound and anguish, and you strike out with your fists, you curse and you swear to make them recognize you. And, alas, it’s seldom successful. (Ellison. 2)
Even thought he is invisible, he still enjoys life’s simply pleasures, like music. He is a huge Louis Armstrong fan because he believes that he was able to be successful and still be invisible at the same time. He believes that Armstrong was successful because he was unaware that he was invisible. Being blind to invisibility leads to great things, but being aware of one’s invisibility leads to understanding. Either way, invisibility is described as a positive rather than a burden.
Most of the story is told in the setting of the narrators “man hole”. He is afraid to come out due to his past experiences. In the narrator’s manhole, he has thousands of lights hung up and steals electricity from the local electric company. He explains how being invisible can have its benefits because he gets free services. The narrator loves light because, although no one else can, he can see himself. The light symbolizes the truth in the world. Through the novel the scenes are very dark and dimly lit. Stereotypes are corrupting the world, therefore diming society.
There are no other point of views throughout the novel, so it...

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