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Historical Elements Of Huxley's Brave New World

611 words - 2 pages

In Aldous Huxley's book Brave New World many themes are about the dark side of this utopia, but this is an allusion to the past. As many significant historical events are drawn up through the book,the director says that "These," he said gravely, "are unpleasant facts, I know it. But then most historical facts are unpleasant." (pg. 24) The director is implying certain evils of communism and Lennon, represented by Leinina. Fascism and Benito Mussolini represented by Benito. These evils are represented, but we also see a very strong connection to Henry Ford and his innovative methods of production
Henry Ford is a basis for their religion, his historical ingenuity and ideals are the same values that people of the world live by. His idea of mas producing cars in the assembly line method, can be clearly displayed in the first chapter of the book, “Solved by standard Gammas, unvarying Deltas, uniform Epsilons. Millions of identical twins. The principle of mass production at last applied to biology” (pg.7). Here we are introduced to the impressive ways that this futuristic world runs. We see that people are genetically bread by mass, implementing the same techniques that Henry Ford used to sell fifteen million Model T fords. Millions of humans are produced every day, losing the aspect of individuality in the society. Like Ford did to make the car cheap and affordable, the World state did to people. They disregarded individuality for the ease and control of making humans to be almost the same.
In this book the world state looks very much like a communist society in which the government plays a very large part in controlling every ones life. One way communism is represented is by the character Lenina, who historically represents Vladamir Lenin. Lenina is someone that is romantically involved...

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