History Of Drug Abuse Essay

711 words - 3 pages

Drug abuse has been a problem for thousands and thousands of years. The entire history of drug abuse is not known, but there are many methods and strategies in order to prevent the abuse of drugs. Drug abuse affects many people and the people around them. There are many rehabilitation centers to help those who need it. Also, there are drug education classes in order to teach the young people as well as the adults about the problem that is happening in our society today.
Drugs are usually taken for “fun”. Unless the drugs are needed or prescribed, they can cause a lot of harm to your body. Drugs are taken to alter, or change thoughts, emotions, and perceptions. They may cause confusion, ...view middle of the document...

(casa columbia) There are more than plenty organizations and people who are more than willing to help. The Samhsa, being one of those organizations,works to improve the quality and availability of substance abuse prevention, alcohol and drug addiction treatment, and mental health services. (samhsa) There is currently no cure for addiction, but there are many ways to prevent it from beginning.
The prevention of drug abuse is possible. The abuse of drugs can be effectively prevented by medical and other health professionals. (casa columbia) We can also protect the youth, teaching about more drug education and how to not give into peer pressure. Zero tolerance towards drugs is also a great way to prevent the addiction of drugs. Schools should be more open and more informative about the topic. Teachers and adults can begin to teach children from a young age about the effects drugs can do to the body and how to say no. Students should learn to stand up for themselves and to not give in to peer pressure. The...

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