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History Of Immigration In The United States

1958 words - 8 pages

Throughout the history of the United States immigration has become apart of our country’s fabric which, began centuries ago. Only to become a hot topic in the US in recent years with its primary focus being illegal immigrants. Illegal immigration is when people enter a country without government permission. As of 2008 the Center for Immigration Studies estimated that there are 11 million illegal immigrants in the US which is down from 2007‘s 12.5 million people. Although the Center for Immigration Studies estimates are very different from other estimates that range from 7 to 20 million. While the Pew Hispanic Center estimated in March of 2009 there are 11.1 million illegal immigrants and that number is from March 2007’s peak of 12 million. The exact number of illegal immigrants is unknown because they are illegal immigrants. A 2005 report from the Pew Hispanic Center stated that 22% of illegal immigrants were from Latin American Countries, mostly from Central America, 13% from Asia, 56% from Mexico, with 6% between Europe and Canada, and 3% were from the rest of the world and Africa. In the United States alone every day there are almost 70,000 foreigners to migrate here. Within those 70,000 over 60,000 of them are businessmen, travelers and students; there are about 5,000 that are illegal immigrants; with 2,000 legal immigrants. Illegal immigrants have been and has continued to outnumber the number of legal immigrants, which has been going on since the 1990’s. It’s partially because of this that US lawmakers have recently made an even bigger attempt at enforcing immigration laws.
Here are important dates in United States immigration. The first US immigration law was the Naturalization Act of 1790. The Naturalization Act specified that “any alien, being a free white person, may be admitted to become a US citizen”. in 1875 the Supreme Court ruled that the Federal Government is responsible for regulating US immigration. Then there was the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which barred certain laborers from migrating to the United States. Between 1885 and 1887 the Alien Contract Labor also, prohibited specific laborers from immigrating to the US. In 1891 the Federal Government took on the duty of admitting, inspecting, rejecting, and processing all immigrant in search of admission to the United States. On January 2, 1892, a Federal US immigration station opened on Ellis Island in New York Harbor. In 1903 a reaffirmed provisions that were in the 1891Act. The US immigration Act of 1907, reorganized the states bordering Mexico that includes Arizona, New Mexico and a large part of Texas. Between 1917 and 1924 there were a series of laws were ratified to limit the number of new aliens. These laws established the quota system and forced passport requirements. They also expanded the categories of excludable aliens and banned all Asians except the Japanese. A 1924 Act was created to reduced the number of US immigration visas and...

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