History Of Immigration In The United States

1958 words - 8 pages

Throughout the history of the United States immigration has become apart of our country’s fabric which, began centuries ago. Only to become a hot topic in the US in recent years with its primary focus being illegal immigrants. Illegal immigration is when people enter a country without government permission. As of 2008 the Center for Immigration Studies estimated that there are 11 million illegal immigrants in the US which is down from 2007‘s 12.5 million people. Although the Center for Immigration Studies estimates are very different from other estimates that range from 7 to 20 million. While the Pew Hispanic Center estimated in March of 2009 there are 11.1 million illegal immigrants and that number is from March 2007’s peak of 12 million. The exact number of illegal immigrants is unknown because they are illegal immigrants. A 2005 report from the Pew Hispanic Center stated that 22% of illegal immigrants were from Latin American Countries, mostly from Central America, 13% from Asia, 56% from Mexico, with 6% between Europe and Canada, and 3% were from the rest of the world and Africa. In the United States alone every day there are almost 70,000 foreigners to migrate here. Within those 70,000 over 60,000 of them are businessmen, travelers and students; there are about 5,000 that are illegal immigrants; with 2,000 legal immigrants. Illegal immigrants have been and has continued to outnumber the number of legal immigrants, which has been going on since the 1990’s. It’s partially because of this that US lawmakers have recently made an even bigger attempt at enforcing immigration laws.
Here are important dates in United States immigration. The first US immigration law was the Naturalization Act of 1790. The Naturalization Act specified that “any alien, being a free white person, may be admitted to become a US citizen”. in 1875 the Supreme Court ruled that the Federal Government is responsible for regulating US immigration. Then there was the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which barred certain laborers from migrating to the United States. Between 1885 and 1887 the Alien Contract Labor also, prohibited specific laborers from immigrating to the US. In 1891 the Federal Government took on the duty of admitting, inspecting, rejecting, and processing all immigrant in search of admission to the United States. On January 2, 1892, a Federal US immigration station opened on Ellis Island in New York Harbor. In 1903 a reaffirmed provisions that were in the 1891Act. The US immigration Act of 1907, reorganized the states bordering Mexico that includes Arizona, New Mexico and a large part of Texas. Between 1917 and 1924 there were a series of laws were ratified to limit the number of new aliens. These laws established the quota system and forced passport requirements. They also expanded the categories of excludable aliens and banned all Asians except the Japanese. A 1924 Act was created to reduced the number of US immigration visas and...

Find Another Essay On History of Immigration in the United States

IMMIGRATION IN THE UNITED STATES Essay

2115 words - 8 pages Immigration has been a very serious problem within the United States for many years. I personally feel that it is hurting our economy because of the drain of open jobs available to our own citizens. Immigration is a very controversial issue not only at home, but also amongst the entire world today. The majority of this "movement" is taking place within the U.S. It...

Immigration in the United States Essay

1338 words - 5 pages Immigration has changed the demographics of the US. It has contributed to a massive growth of the US population. The inflow of immigrants has added a good mix of various ethnic and racial groups to the US population. The immigrant groups have had a tremendous impact on the social, cultural, economic and political landscape of the US. Initially Europeans came into America as immigrants during the Industrial Revolution. Many years later the...

The Restriction of Immigration in the United States

580 words - 2 pages The Restriction of Immigration in the United States Immigration should be restricted in the United States. There are many political, social, and economic reasons why restrictions should be put on immigration. The United States Government and the welfare of its citizens are chaotic enough, without having to deal with the influx of thousands of new immigrants each year. Along with the myriad immigrants to the U.S., come just...

Decreasing Restriction of Immigration Flow in the United States

1888 words - 8 pages Decreasing Restriction of Immigration Flow in the United States In the19th century, the fundamental of philosophy and policy was free trade. Freedom of movement was generally seen as an essential part of it. It was the best way to insure individuals that labor would be spread evenly among various geographical areas so that it was most useful for private and social prosperity. However, today the philosophy is the same but it is not any more...

Pro Immigration in the United States

1332 words - 5 pages One of our nation's biggest problems if you would call it a problem is Immigration. I am writing this to inform my readers or in this case reader why immigration should be legal. I have based my research on three things, economy, Social Security, and freedom of life. I hope this essay will help you see a different perspective of immigration and what it can do for our country. Immigration has been going on in America since the seventeenth...

Immigration Policy in the United States

2012 words - 8 pages            We are now in the 21st century and like the beginning of the 20th century the United States finds itself in the throes of a period of mass immigration. More then one million immigrants enter the Unites States, both legally and illegally every single year. Many argue that this new wave of mass immigration may help sustain the success that our nation is having in regard to the way of living that many American have come accustomed to...

Immigration and Nativism in the United States

2141 words - 9 pages Immigration and Nativism in the United States In the United States, the cliché of a nation of immigrants is often invoked. Indeed, very few Americans can trace their ancestry to what is now the United States, and the origins of its immigrants have changed many times in American history. Despite the identity of an immigrant nation, changes in the origins of immigrants have often been met with resistance. What began with white,...

Illegal Immigration In The United States

1221 words - 5 pages National Issues Paper: Illegal Immigration There are more than 10 million illegal immigrants living in the United Sates, and each day that number is increasing by 1,400 illegal aliens. An illegal immigrant is a foreigner who either illegally crossed an international political border, whether it was by land, sea or air, or whether it be a foreigner who legally entered a country but nevertheless overstayed their visa in order to live and/or...

Illegal Immigration in the United States

930 words - 4 pages Illegal immigration in the US is and has been an ongoing battle for many years. According to legal-dictionary an illegal immigrant is define as an alien (non-citizen) who has entered the united sates without government permission or stayed beyond the termination date of a visa. There are many problems that occur such as overpopulation, raising crime rates and unemployment. Some Americans have issues with illegal immigration and some do not....

Immigration to the United States

759 words - 3 pages Immigration to the United States Works Cited Not Included Immigration to the United States has been happening since the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock in 1492. America is one of the most diverse nations in the world, attracting people from every corner of the globe in hopes of a better way of life. America in the past has relied on migrant workers to balance the economies growth when internal resources have been exhausted; moreover, the...

The Debate in the United States Over Immigration

1300 words - 5 pages The Debate in the United States over Immigration      Immigration plays a huge role in the population of the United States. The U.S. is looked at as a place for a new start and a place to begin a new life. This country gives people the opportunity to make their own choices and have their own freedom, who are we to decide who can have these rights or not. Should Americans really have to right to deny another human being the right to live in...

Similar Essays

Immigration In The United States Of America

1118 words - 4 pages "Every immigrant who comes here should be required within five years to learn English or leave the country" said Theodore Roosevelt one of the forty four presidents of the United States. Nowadays, being a great empire in the international arena and the country full of opportunities America faces immigration from all over the world that in turn makes various problems within the country. It continues to be one of the controversial and divisive...

The History Of Mexican Immigration To The United States

2079 words - 8 pages The History of Mexican Immigration to the United States Missing Works Cited Over the passed one and a half centuries, since the Treaty of Hidalgo in 1848 gave the United States most lands north of the Rio Grande, the 1200 mile United States-Mexican border has been a very active one. Mexicans have emigrated from their homeland in droves over these years in three major phases preceded by a small phase. The Mexicans have made this exodus in...

Immigration In The United States Essay

1983 words - 8 pages Immigration is what has made America what it is today. An immigrant is a person who comes to a country to take up permanent residence. Everyone in the United States of America is an immigrant either moving here themselves or being directly related to someone who did. All of us came from different parts of the world even as far back as the Native Americans when they emigrated from Asia to the United States. Immigration is needed to grow America...

Immigration In The United States Essay

1104 words - 4 pages The United States has often been referred to as a global “melting pot” due to its assimilation of diverse cultures, nationalities, and ethnicities. In today’s society, this metaphor may be an understatement. Between 1990 and 2010, the number of foreign born United States residents nearly doubled from 20 million to 40 million, increasing the U.S. population from almost 250 million to 350 million people. With U.S. born children and grandchildren of...