Hitler's Reasons For The Holocaust Essay

2048 words - 9 pages

The war waged by Hitler and his accomplices was a war against the Jewish people, Jewish culture and thus, Jewish memory. While some may leave a smear on the world’s past, some – like the homicide of Semitic people – may leave a scar. The Holocaust, closely tied to World War II, was a devastating and systematic persecution of millions of Jews by the Nazi regime and allies. Hitler, an anti-Semitic leader of the Nazis, believed that the Jewish race made the Aryan race impure. The Nazis did all in their power to annihilate the followers of Judaism, while the Jews attempted to rebel, rioted against the government, and united as one. Furthermore, the genocide had many social science factors that caused the opposition between the Jews and Nazis. Both the German economy and the Nuremberg Laws stimulated the Holocaust; nevertheless, a majority of the Nazis’ and Hitler’s actions towards Jews were because of the victims’ ethnicity.
The German economy complicated the Nazis’ financial situation because of events that happened before the Holocaust. When the stock market collapsed it sent financial markets worldwide into a tailspin with disastrous effects. The German economy was especially vulnerable since it was built upon foreign capital, mostly loans from America and was very dependent on foreign trade (World History Honors Handout). When those loans suddenly came due and when the world market for German exports dried up, the well-oiled German industrial machine quickly ground to a halt(World History Handout). As production levels fell, German workers were laid off. Along with this, banks failed throughout Germany. Savings accounts, the result of years of hard work, were instantly wiped out. Inflation soon followed making it hard for families to purchase expensive necessities with devalued money, Overnight; the middle class standard of living so many German families enjoyed was ruined by events outside of Germany, beyond their control (WHH). The Great Depression began and they were cast into poverty and deep misery and began looking for a solution, any solution. Adolf Hitler knew his opportunity had arrived .Adolf Hitler and The Nazi Party rebounding from the great depression had German people aim there hate towards Jews. Blaming there problems on the Jews. According to a Teachers Guide to the Holocaust, Approximately 11 million people were killed because of Nazi genocidal policy. There was evidence in 1919 Hitler had a Strong hatred for Jews because he believes that the Jew s caused Germany to loose world war one (Resisters). This resulted in taking away the Germanic Jews rights from 1933-1939. Nuremburg Laws deprived Jews of German citizenship also taking their rights (Resistance). Jews were segregated and discriminated against awfully. It was to the point where Nazis burned down there synagogues vandalized there businesses, taking Jewish children in schools, banning Jews from public places (Resisters). Hitler was convincing millions of people what he...

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