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'homelanding' By Margaret Atwood Essay

583 words - 2 pages

I was in fact very confused by the way Atwood describes the condition of the earth to the outsider (or alien). Because when you start to explain something to someone, you assume that both of you must first know and agree with something together. This feeling started from Atwood’s description of a funeral: “When a person has achieved death a kind of PICNIC is held…”, I thought the word PICNIC quite hilarious, as if an alien would know what a picnic is in the first place. And then I recall having seen a movie about a girl making a documentary. A character referred to “documentary” as “a kind of movie, just boring”. It’s like when we are talking to children. When children ask us about something complicated, we would explain it in simple words which they already know. Following this logic, Atwood must have made quite some assumptions of the aliens: They know what countries, arms, legs, seaweeds, furs, lizards, muscle tissues, communities, mirrors …are. In fact, they don’t even refer to the Earth as “a planet”. Instead, Atwood explains it as a country (not even an area). So Atwood might have expected the alien to think of all these words as the same thing we know.But it is ridiculous to interpret Atwood this way, perhaps she has never meant to have thess assumptions, instead, she would simply like to express the things we take for granted in another way. And with this other perspective of looking at things normal to us, we might realize how simple life can be, and what other true beauty there is to experience on this earth. Atwood has covered the appearance of human beings, what human beings live on...

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