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Homelessness In The United States Essay

1260 words - 6 pages

Homelessness is a vast predicament in America and around the world. It is severely overlooked as people don’t really think of homelessness as real world problem. However, there have been ways that people have tried to fix the problem. They have come up with homeless shelters, emergency shelters, food banks and soup kitchens. These solutions have limitations though, which will hopefully come to an end.
While Soup Kitchens are a way to feed the poor or homeless, it not a program that effectively helps the homeless onto their feet, it simply keeps them fed. (www.merriam-webster.com) These do help the unsheltered homeless population though. While there are shelters, not everyone has access to them or some even chose not to go. In the city of Los Angeles, there are about 27,000 homeless people who are unsheltered, that’s 1 in 378. There are various factors that cause homelessness; these include a decline in public assistance, domestic violence, drug and alcohol abuse, job loss, divorce, low wages, poverty, severe depression, physical disabilities or mental illnesses. From the year 2011 to 2012, the number of homeless people skyrocketed. In New York City alone, there are more homeless people in the year 2014 than there were in the recession of the 1980s. (www.studentsagainsthunger.org)
It is extremely difficult to keep track of all of the homeless individuals because there is a large proportion of them that live in vehicles abandoned houses or buildings, park areas. The number of homeless people varies throughout seasons as they seek shelter in warmer places.
Homeless Shelters are described as “temporary residences” to protect vulnerable populations. Homeless shelters basically supply a bed for the night and are also a first come first serve system. Homeless shelters tend to be a “one size fits all” model. There are some homeless shelters for specific groups like families with youth or women with children. Unfortunately, all systems require the persons to leave each morning and hopefully find a spot when they come back. There are also day-time homeless shelters for people who could not access the shelters at night. Homeless shelters usually have ridiculous curfews that vary widely throughout the United States. Homeless shelters are non-profit organizations that are usually associated with churches or state governments. Circumstances to enter a homeless shelter include but are not limited to: health complications, unpaid bills, abuse or even a missed paycheck. The people who stay in homeless shelters vary throughout seasons as more people try to stay warm when it gets cold. (www.coalitionforthehomeless.org)
They took homeless shelters a step further and came up with emergency shelters. Emergency shelters are a place for people to live temporarily when they cannot live in their previous residence, similar to homeless shelters. The difference that both have is that emergency shelters specialize in people trying to escape certain situations like...

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