Homer's Odyssey And Iliad, J.R.R Tolkien's Hobbit, And The Quest Of Change

2620 words - 10 pages

Most comparisons derived from actual books, especially 'The Hero with a Thousand Faces.' The essay uses those three books and proves how a main character, who partakes on a quest, changes.

The Quest:

An Adventure of Change

A hero, usually the principle character of a story, is an individual of distinguished courage who is admired for their brave deeds. These characteristics and respected accomplishments are established in an adventure or a quest that they have been involved in. On these adventures that is a search for something, the character encounters obstacles testing their skills of strength and intelligence. The quest is a process of mental and spiritual transformation for the characters, and this is evident of Theseus from a combination of Greek mythological writings, Bilbo Baggins in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit, and Odysseus in Homer's The Odyssey.

Theseus is a character who was written by many Greek mythological writers, and a person of many quests. His first quest was a decision on his own, and it was a quest where there was nothing to be searched for. The journey along the land route across the Isthmus of Corinth proved that Theseus was a courageous warrior. At the age of 16 he knew he was strong and believed that he was the son of the god Poseidon, however, he had never tested his skills as a warrior and was not sure if he would succeed in his quest along the Isthmus. Since childhood he had listened to the tales of Heracles and wished to make his name known for his actions, and this was his chance. Setting out on his voyage, alone and unarmed, he soon met with Periphetes who enjoyed cracking the skulls of people with his bronze club. Theseus was obviously no match for this beast, but he proved to be supple, quick, intelligent and fearless. These skills, which surprised Theseus,

-2-

managed him to seize the club from the beast and kill him. In this confrontation, Theseus learned of his newly found skills and no longer feared the rest of his dangerous journey. The other outlaws that Theseus met along this journey were strong, savage people and, in size, had the advantage over Theseus, but he proved them wrong. Theseus killed Sinis, the robber; Phaea, the dangerous boar; Sceiron, another robber; King Cercyon, the wrestler and Damastes, the stretcher with his ingenuity, the belief in himself to succeed and his strength. He was praised by all for clearing the isthmus, which was never traveled for fear of death. In that journey, Theseus learned that he was much more than an average sixteen years old boy, he was a brave and intelligent warrior and no longer had fear towards anything. These characteristics carried over to his more famous quest, the slaying of the minotaur. Minos demanded a yearly tribute because of the murder of his son that seven...

Find Another Essay On Homer's Odyssey and Iliad, J.R.R Tolkien's Hobbit, and the Quest of Change

Overview of J.R.R. Tolkien's creation of Middle-earth: includes the Silmarillion, the Hobbit, and the Lord of the Rings.

1872 words - 7 pages Not often can a reader pick up a novel and be transported into a world where they can feel, smell, taste, see, and live the story unfolding around them. Stories so rich in history and culture could only be created by the world-renowned author, J.R.R. Tolkien. His works, including "The Silmarillion", "The Hobbit", and the famous trilogy "The Lord of the Rings", have been read by millions of people across the globe. Tolkien's stories take place...

The Plot in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit

3040 words - 12 pages The Plot in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien is a captivating tale about unusual creatures, great struggles, a flying dragon, and much, much more. The story comes alive through colorful depictions of characters and details that capture the imagination. The plot of this novel is the dwarves' journey to recapture their homeland. The setting, characters, and trials throughout The Hobbit help to fully shape this...

The Gods in Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey

1408 words - 6 pages The Gods in Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey The stories told in the Iliad and Odyssey are based on stories handed down over several generations, for they preserve (as we have seen) memories of an already quiet far distant past. The two pomes show clear connection in their language and style, in the manner in which their incidents presented, and in the combination of agreement with level, which distinguish their creation. The work was...

Homer's: The story of "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey" And the Gods

1370 words - 5 pages The stories told in "The Iliad" and "Odyssey" are based on stories handed down over several generations, for they preserve (as we have seen) memories of an already quiet far distant past. The two poems show clear connection in their language and style, in the manner in which their incidents presented, and in the combination of agreement with level, which distinguish their creation.The work was written by one author but gave two diverse...

Evil Within the World, Depicted in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit

3441 words - 14 pages Since the dawn of time, mankind has been plagued with the ever existing evils of the world. From the first murder by Cain to the opening of Pandora’s Box, the concept of evil has permeated itself into the societies and cultures of the world throughout time. However, in a world of darkness we stand not alone. For wherever evil dwells, the forces of good are always likewise present to maintain the balance: right? In today’s western world we often...

The Battle of the Five Armies in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit

638 words - 3 pages The Battle of the Five Armies in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit Many great works of literature contain violent scene that contribute more to the story than merely an exciting battle to amuse the reader. J.R.R. Tolkien includes several violent scenes throughout his classic work, “The Hobbit”. The most important of these is “The Battle of the Five Armies,” which takes place at the end of the novel. This destructive scene has many purposes in the...

Achilles as the Anti-Hero in Homer's "Iliad." Is Achilles' behavior justified, and does he change by the end of the story?

1125 words - 5 pages From beginning to end of Homer's The Iliad, Achilles is portrayed as a man stagnant in his ways. He is arrogant, impatient, unforgiving, vengeful, and extremely stubborn, and these awful attributes never cease. Achilles' lack of compassion perplexes the present situation involving the...

Analysis of Tolkien's The Hobbit

2268 words - 9 pages J.R.R. Tolkien starts his world renowned book The Hobbit with, “In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit” (1). This book is a tale of a small hobbit named Bilbo and his ever-memorable journey through the evil world during his time. Living in the Shire, as his homeland is called, it is very calm and pleasant for Bilbo, but once the outer limits of the land are reached Bilbo is in for a great surprise. Needing a burglar on his journey Gandalf...

The Odyssey and the Iliad

1191 words - 5 pages The Odyssey and the Iliad      In our day and age, people strive for independence and a sense of authority. However, at many times this is more easily said than done. Whether it be God, or in the eyes of the Achaeans and Trojans, the immortals, lives and actions are commonly defined by a higher being. Which leads to Homer’s epic poems the Odyssey and the Iliad which deal with constant conflict in a world...

J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings

1961 words - 8 pages J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings "Three Rings for the Eleven-kings under the sky, Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone, Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die, One for the Dark Lord on his Dark throne, In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. One Ring to rule them all, One ring to find them, One ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them, In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie(Tolkien)." Master of storytelling...

J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

2530 words - 10 pages J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings J.R.R Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings strikes a cord with almost everyone who reads it. Its popularity has not waned with the passing of time, nor is its appeal centered on one age group or generation. Book sales would indicate that The Lord of the Rings is at least as popular now as it ever was, if not more so. Some estimates put it at the second highest selling work of all time, following only the...

Similar Essays

J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit And The Lord Of The Rings

2514 words - 10 pages The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings have been beloved works among many generations of readers since they were first published. The author of these two books, J.R.R. Tolkien is just as interesting a man as many of the characters he created in the world of Middle-Earth. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was born in Africa to a banker manager and his wife in 1892 and had only one sibling, Hilary, who was less than two years younger (Wikipedia). When he was...

J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit Essay

2363 words - 9 pages Bilbo Baggins, a respectable and unadventurous hobbit, is paid a visit by Gandalf, a wizard, who offers him the chance to go on an adventure. Bilbo, in trying to get rid of the wizard, inadvertently invites him to tea the next evening. The next day, Bilbo is flustered to find that in addition to Gandalf, he seems to have invited thirteen dwarves to tea as well. As he serves the dwarves and Gandalf tea and then supper, Bilbo learns that Gandalf...

Tolkien's "The Hobbit" Compared To Homer's "The Odyssey"

825 words - 3 pages The Odyssey is an epic poem written by Homer and passed down the centuries by the oral tradition.

The Funeral Games Of Patroklos In Homer's Iliad And Odyssey

2341 words - 9 pages The Funeral Games of Patroklos in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey        Coming towards the end of a war which has consumed an entire decade and laid waste the lives of many, the Greek warriors in Troy choose to take the time and energy to hold funeral games.  This sequence of events leaves the reader feeling confused because it's not something one would expect and seems highly out of place.  Throughout the epic Homer tries to describe what...