This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

How Baseball Survived The Great Depression

872 words - 4 pages

Baseball remains today one of America’s most popular sports, and furthermore, baseball is one of America’s most successful forms of entertainment. As a result, Baseball is an economic being of its own. However, the sustainability of any professional sport organization depends directly on its economic capabilities. For example, in Baseball, all revenue is a product of the fans reaction to ticket prices, advertisements, television contracts, etc. During the devastating Great Depression in 1929, the fans of baseball experienced fiscal suffering. The appeal of baseball declined as more and more people were trying to make enough money to live. There was a significant drop in attention, attendance, and enjoyment. Although baseball’s vitality might have seemed threatened by the overwhelming Great Depression, the baseball community modernized their sport by implementing new changes that resulted in the game’s survival.
Radio broadcasting was one development that kept “America’s Pastime” alive, and provided the sport with additional audience. During these rough times, many people could not afford tickets to baseball games, so listening to the radio was an option that was very appealing. Naturally, some baseball club owners claimed that putting games on the air was hurting attendance. However, evidence shows that the radio broadcasting caused more people to gain interest in the sport, causing more people to attend the sport. For example, the St. Louis Cardinals outlawed broadcasting during the 1934 season, and attendance levels decreased to 283,000 less than the 1931 championship season. The public clearly enjoyed the new radio broadcasting of games, and the media expressed their feelings. The Chicago Tribune released a fervent argument for broadcasting of games saying, “There are many who cannot afford baseball…Their finest interest is maintained by air reports which they have the time to hear if not the money to go to the Sheffield Avenue Grounds. None can tell us they will not be at the windows to buy tickets when conditions change.” This argument shows the strong support that many people felt for radio broadcasting. Radio broadcasting contributed to the survival of baseball in two ways. First, radio broadcast kept people who could not afford tickets interested in the game. Second, radio broadcasting brought in new fans that lived far away or never could afford to attend games. Therefore, radio broadcasting was a popular and ingenious contribution to the survival of baseball during the great depression.
In addition, the farm system was created and refined during the great depression. The farm system was a...

Find Another Essay On How Baseball Survived the Great Depression

How the Great Depression Changed the Federal Relationship

759 words - 4 pages The period before the great depression, the 1920s, was known as the Roaring Twenties or the Jazz age. This Era was marked by artistic movement such as the creation of Jazz music and a rich supply of American writing. During this time the federal government had been providing some aid to the states but leaving the bulk of the power to the states, which is known as a dual federalism. It also marked the end of modest social traditions and wave of

How Did The Great Depression Come To Be?

770 words - 4 pages Great Depression had many causes as to how it came to be. The main three reasons The Great Depression came the way it did was because us Americans kept buying until we broke the business cycle, leading to a pause in debt and trade production declining.

How Roosevelt And His New Deal Prolonged The Great Depression

1579 words - 7 pages FDR’s Folley: How Roosevelt And His New Deal Prolonged The Great Depression The traditional view of Franklin D. Roosevelt is that he motivated and helped the United States during the “Great Depression” and was a great president, however, as time has passed, economist historians have begun analyzing Roosevelt’s presidency. Many have concluded that he did not help America during the Great Depression but instead amplified and prolonged the

The Great Depression: Causes and how the New Deal prolonged the Depression

2085 words - 8 pages When Herbert Hoover was inaugurated as the thirty-first President of the United States early in 1929, the nation was enjoying unprecedented prosperity. But by the end of the year, the stock market had crashed and the country was headed for the Great Depression. President Hoover tried to fight the Great Depression, but as he neared the end of his term, the American economy was in its worst state yet, and many fearful citizens wanted a leader who

The Great Depression Essay

1279 words - 5 pages Many adolescents, In the Great Depression, received the full affects and suffered. Some were left hungry, impoverished, and hopeless, how are adolescents today compared? The 30’s were a time of great distress for many Americans. Events such as the stock market crash, an economy suffering from being inflated, overuse of credit, a farming crisis, and other events led America to the economic downfall known as the Great Depression. During the great

The Great Depression

2358 words - 10 pages survived the Great Depression and listen to their stories and how it had affected their future lives. The greatest challenge I encountered was that the survivors of the Depression were approaching the culmination of their lives but gladly their stories flow freely, stories of innumerable wounds and exquisite joys. Talking to a number of them I learnt of how they experienced mortification and bewildering kindness, jiffies of fear and cherished

The great depression

1611 words - 6 pages THE GREAT DEPRESSION"What attempts were made to try and solve the problem of the Great Depression in Australia and why did they have so little success?"The Great Depression of the 1930s is a time that will always be remembered around the world as the worst economic slump ever to affect the US, and consequently the rest of the industrialised world. The Depression brought with it many ramifications such as a huge drop in the living standards of

The Great Depression

1328 words - 5 pages work without adequate schooling. The Great Depression affected people both physically and psychologically. It was an era of unemployment, family struggles, and the way they survived.      The Great Depression was an era of unemployment. One of the main causes of unemployment was the combination of the greatly unequal distribution of wealth throughout the twenties. The unequal distribution of wealth had gone on forever

The Great Depression( Canada)

1013 words - 4 pages The great depression, a time that was hard for almost all Canadian citizens. A time where Canadians looked towards there government for some form of decisive action that would end the great depression but unfortunately, Canadians only received relief efforts and attempts at protecting our economy both of which where horrible inadequate. As a result, Canadians during this time faced a series of hardships which worsened the human condition

The Great Depression( Canada)

1013 words - 4 pages The great depression, a time that was hard for almost all Canadian citizens. A time where Canadians looked towards there government for some form of decisive action that would end the great depression but unfortunately, Canadians only received relief efforts and attempts at protecting our economy both of which where horrible inadequate. As a result, Canadians during this time faced a series of hardships which worsened the human condition

The Great Depression

1759 words - 8 pages tackling the depression, it was a slow recovery. Looking back, it is uncertain how much the New Deal helped end the depression, it certainly helped by easing hardships and creating jobs, but the depression was still quite bad at the end of the 1930’s. It was not until World War II that the United States fully recovered from the Great Depression and returned to an economic super power. Life during the 1930’s was devastating; Americans were deprived

Similar Essays

Baseball During The Great Depression Essay

1013 words - 4 pages . During the devastating Great Depression in 1929, the fans of baseball experienced fiscal suffering. The appeal of baseball declined as more and more people were trying to make enough money to live. There was a significant drop in attention, attendance, and enjoyment. Although baseball’s vitality might have seemed threatened by the overwhelming Great Depression, the baseball community modernized their sport by implementing new changes that

How The Great Depression Affected The Us And The World

1016 words - 4 pages The Great Depression is the period of history that followed "Black Thursday", the stock market crash of Thursday, October 24, 1929. The events in the United States triggered a world-wide depression, which led to deflation and a great increase in unemployment. Many economists argue that the Great Depression was both caused and prolonged by government action. The Hoover administration and the Congress increased taxes in a futile attempt to balance

How The Great Depression Paved The Road For Hitler

1143 words - 5 pages takes a complicated topic, then breaks it down into an easy to understand list. It gives a basic summary of how Hitler rose to power, and it has something called a “Test Bite” to quiz yourself to check your understanding of this topic. The great depression allowed Hitler to take advantage of the citizens’ destitution in order to gain their support. Hitler was able to get people to follow him because he came along at the right time, a time when

How To Become A Great Baseball Player

495 words - 2 pages      Being great at a particular sport, such as baseball, is actually quite simple. It takes a mix of talent and even more hard work. I have seen a very large number of athletes come through this high school with all the talent in the world, but had no work ethic. Talent is only a fraction of what is needed to be great.            The process of becoming a great baseball