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How Do Implicit Attitudes Influence How We Respond To Other?

1476 words - 6 pages

How do implicit attitudes influence how we respond to Other?
Individuals’ mechanical systems for evaluating the world developed over the course of evolutionary history. Such mental operations provide tools for understanding the circumstances, assessing the important concepts, and heartening behavior without having to think or actually thinking at all. These automated preferences are called implicit attitudes.
“Implicit attitude is defined as unacknowledged attitudes external to a person’s awareness which nonetheless have measurable effects on people’s response times to stimulations” (Grinnell, 2009). This is a topic of importance on reading within the field of social psychology.
According to Haddock & Maio (2004), “The Attitude conception has long formed an essential paradigm in social psychology”. Asch (1940) argued that the main route “in influence is not change in attitudes toward an individual but rather change in the definition and meaning of the individual” (Wood, 2000). Many people have the same feeling when it comes to questions related to the death penalty, prayer in schools, violence on television regulation, and political issues.
Psychologist’s definitions of attitudes include assessing problems, persons, or actions. These assessments are regularly affirmative or adverse, and unclear. Humans have established attitudes about such issues, and these attitudes influence his or her beliefs as well as behavior. Because people are largely unaware of his or her implicit attitudes, they can have difficulty changing these attitudes.
Implicit attitudes are positive and negative assessments that occur outside of one’s conscious cognizance and controls. The affirmative or adverse views, feelings, or actions towards individuals which arise due to past experiences which one is either unaware of or which one cannot attribute to an identified previous experience.
Attitudes can also arise due to observational learning, wherein people internalize the attitudes of others; passing them on from one individual to the other. Attitudes can be held implicitly and do not innately imply behavior. Often individual’s will have consideration of a ground or opinion but not act on it when the chance rises. Many factors influence whether or not attitudes will come to impact behavior.
The stronger an attitude is, the more likely it is to translate to one’s actions. Likewise, the more thorough the assertiveness is to the confined conduct, the more it will be pertinent for said behavior. If rational thought leads to the decision that a behavior should be done based upon a said assertiveness, and it is decided that the behavior can be done, most likely those behaviors will ascend (The THINK SPOT, 2013).
One way in which attitude change occurs is via cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance is an occurrence in which a person experiences psychological distress due to conflicting thoughts or beliefs. The tendency to be affected by cognitive dissonance is affected...

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