How Did African Americans Attempt To Deal With Issues Of Racism In The Period Between 1898 1930?

783 words - 3 pages

Student: Carlyle NesbethID No.: 620051818Course: From Developing to "Developed": North America 1815-1980 from 1870Course Code: HIST2204EssayHow did African- Americans attempt to deal with issues of racism in the period between 1898-1930?According to M. E. Sharp, racism refers to practices in social or political systems that consider different races to be ranked as superior or inferior to each other, treating each other differently. Racism and racial discrimination are often used to describe discrimination on an ethnic or cultural basis, independent of whether these differences are described as racial. According to the United Nations convention, there is no distinction between the terms racial discrimination and ethnic discrimination, and superiority based on racial differentiation is scientifically false, morally condemnable, socially unjust and dangerous, and that there is no justification for racial discrimination, in theory or in practice, anywhere. Racism has been a major issue in America since the colonial era and slavery era. According to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, between 1626 and 1850, a total of 305,326 slaves were forcefully transported by ship to the Americas. According to the 1860 U.S. census, there were about 385,000 slave owners out of approximately 1.5 million white families. These whites were in charge of all affairs, black slaves included.America in the late 1800s to early 1900s was a turbulent time for blacks. During this period racism was at its highest especially in the southern states of America. Because of the growing tension, a number of organizations were formed to advocate movement of blacks from states of racial turbulence to states where they would enjoy freedom. African Americans moved from the south to northern states such as New York (Harlem), Chicago, and Boston. In Chicago between 1910 and 1970, the percentage of African-Americans jumped from 2.0 percent to 32.7 percent. Migration was beneficial to black as, migrating blacks were more likely to become literate than those who remained in the South. Historians term the movement as 'the great migration' due to the vast number of blacks migrating from the south to the north. The rapid influx of blacks disturbed the racial balance within cities, exacerbating hostility from both black and white Northerners. Stereotypic schemas of Southern blacks were used to attribute issues in urban areas, such as crime and disease, to the presence of African-Americans. Overall, African-Americans in Northern cities experienced...

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