How Did Jackie Robinson Playing Baseball Effect African Americans?

988 words - 4 pages

Jackie Robinson wore number 42 on the field when he played for the Dodgers in 1947 (Jackie Robinson). He was born in Cairo, Georgia. He was the first Athlete at UCLA to get a varsity letter in four sports Football, basketball, track and baseball. Forced to leave college due to finical reason, Jackie had enlisted in the Army (Jackie Robinson). Jackie had a successful Army career too, after just two years he had become a Second Lieutenant, but that career was cut short too when he was court marshaled due to racial objections (Jackie Robinson). Jackie Robinson was brave enough to play baseball knowing the risk he was taking playing in the league at such a racist time. A quote said by Jackie ...view middle of the document...

"- Jackie Robinson, (Jackie Robinson).
Jackie Robinson was a 5’11 204 pound African American entered the league at the age of 28 and still won rookie of the year (Jackie Robinson). 1949 was his year, he was named to his first all-star game, and he led in stolen bases and was named the league’s MVP (Jackie Robinson). One of Jackie Robinsons Brothers was in the Berlin Olympics and ran the 100 meter dash and got second place, Jackie Robinson had a successful line of family, Jackie being the first black in MLB accomplished many thing whites couldn’t do, the one stat Jackie was well known for was stolen bases, Jackie had 197 in 10 seasons and his season high was 37 in 1949 which was the year he won the MVP (Jackie Robinson). Not many whites can win an MVP like Jackie did, Jackie was the Dodgers best player and he still got criticized, people treated him badly simply by the color of his skin when he was a good baseball player which was the sport he played. He wasn’t good and everyone on the team hated him. Quote by Jackie "A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives." (Jackie Robinson).
In the year Robinson first came to the Dodgers he led the league with 29 steals, he also had 12 home runs and won the league’s rookie of the year (Jackie Robinson). Out of all people the one who was criticized the most of the color of his skin overcame the hate and became great. He broke MLBs color barriers and was inducted into the MLB Hall Of Fame in 1962 also the first African American Inducted into the HOF (Jackie Robinson). According to Duke Snider “ He was the greatest Competitor I have ever seen” (Jackie Robinson). That was coming from a...

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