How Do Both Carhlotte Brontë And Daphne Du Maurier Explore The Dificulties Faced By Two Young Women In "Jane Eyre" And "Rebecca"?

1280 words - 5 pages

'He had not imagined that a woman would dare speak so to a man.'Taken from Jane Eyre, this quote depicts the foremost difficulty which the two young women must face, the prejudice other people place on them, and what they must do to rise above these preconceptions.In the novels Jane Eyre and Rebecca, we are presented with the life-journeys of two young women, their obstacles, and the way they develop amongst these problems. In this essay I will explore these hindrances and how the young women confront and behave towards them.In many ways, the two characters, Jane and Mrs De Winter, are noticeably similar. There is one primary factor that stands out from all others; they are both considerably young. Jane is only a child when orphaned into the house of her Aunt Reed; she experiences cruel discrimination for the first time and is 'humbled by the consciousness of her physical inferiority.' Similarly, Mrs De Winter, untrained and inexperienced in a new world, is suddenly thrown into an unaccustomed lifestyle, at the tender age of about twenty, although it is never specified. The foreign and sometimes glamorous surroundings and situations the young women find themselves in, tend to diminish the values of their persons, due to their age. Both are often looked upon as insignificant, 'she cast on me an angry glance, as if I were in fault'. The two young women also have no immediate family or friends in which to seek comfort in, and so are quite alone in the world. However, Jane, who is notably wiser secures some companionship with Helen Burns, Miss Temple, Bessie and Adele through her journeys. Mrs De Winter fails to achieve friendship, mostly due to the impression we are given of her childhood and upbringing, which seems quite isolated. However, Jane Eyre and Mrs De Winter are continually singled out and emphasis is placed on the two as individuals, who are apart from everyone else. The two young women are also both attracted to and eventually in love with older men, who first seem mysterious and extremely intricate characters, but turn out to be caring men, with a lamentable secret. Jane's love for Mr Rochester is gradual and slow to develop, while Mrs De Winters supposed love could be called infatuation due to the abruptness and surreal circumstances. However, her love could also be called gradual, as Maxim De Winters true feelings are only brought out towards the end of the novel, when he has had time to learn to love Mrs De Winter in return.It is not only the two women who hold likenesses. Mr Rochester in Jane Eyre, and Maxim De Winter in Rebecca, also share similarities. When introduced into the book, Maxim De Winter instantly defies conventions, 'it was a surprise, therefore, to find that this newcomer remained standing.' Our attention is drawn to him at once. He suddenly becomes a man who cannot even begin to be compared to other males. Mrs De Winter is not used to this attention and in the naiveté and rashness of young age is immediately...

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