How The Salem Witch Trials Relate To The Changes Occuring During The Late 17th Century In Colonial British America.

744 words - 3 pages

Colonial America was bursting with changes throughout the late 17th century and into the early 18th century. A new time era known as "The Enlightenment" came about which brought many advances in medicine, science, botany, and education. Also, the "Great Awakening", a time of great religious revival flourished. A well known event, the Salem Witch Trials were known as an essential turning point in history. It showed how religion and government changed through history. British America became a more stable environment with mixed results due to these turning points."The Enlightenment" was a period known for many advances. Disease was still strong, and Cotton Mather and Zabdiel Boylston are credited for the first inoculation of any kind. The Enlightenment inspired new technology. Scientific advancement was by far the most interesting. Sir Isaac Newton is acknowledged with his theory of gravity and John Locke was accredited for noting the fact that knowledge is gained by experience. Up until these theories had been proved many people believed that spiritual Gods controlled their destiny. Advancement in education improved also, with many schools and colleges being formed. Studies of botany and plant life helped with crop growth and supported families. Many individual began medical training and surgery practices were proving to be safer than in the past.Religion was known to vary greatly between cultural groups. The Great Awakening was a wave of religious revivals. It quickly swept thru New England and increased conversions and church memberships. It was once believed that life was predestined by God, but the happenings of the Great Awakening ended that notion. The movement shattered the existing church structure of the colonies, as congregations wakened to the teaching style or revivalist, or New Light, ministries. There views were liberal, explaining the consequences of leading a "bad life".We are able to compare the events of the Salem Witch trials with that of the changes that occurred during the Enlightenment and the Great Awakening. First, let's look at the events of the Salem Witch trials. The Salem Witch trials which occurred in 1692, proves how difficult the period of life for the Salem Village was back in those times. Salem was under British rule, since it was part of...

Find Another Essay On How the Salem Witch Trials relate to the changes occuring during the late 17th century in colonial British America.

The Salem Witch Trials Essay

1549 words - 6 pages The Salem Witch Trials were a prime part of American history during the early 17th century. During this time, religion was the prime focus and way of life within colonies. This was especially true for the Puritan way of life. Puritans first came to America in hopes of practicing Christianity their own way, to the purest form. The Puritans were fundamentalists who believed every word transcribed in the Bible by God was to be followed exactly for

The Salem Witch Trials Essay

1357 words - 5 pages The Salem Witch Trials The witch trials of the late 1600's were full of controversy and uncertainty. The Puritan town of Salem was home to most of these trials, and became the center of much attention in 1692. More than a hundred innocent people were found guilty of practicing witchcraft during these times, and our American government forced over a dozen to pay with their lives. The main reasons why the witch trials occurred were conflicts

The Salem Witch Trials

1537 words - 7 pages During the seventeenth century Salem, Massachusetts is a seaport town populated mostly by Puritan colonists who came over from England in the seventeenth century. Beliefs of witchcraft came over with the settlers who, if caught practicing, was punishable by death. The Salem Witch Trials were a series of court cases in 1692 revolving around witchcraft where over hundred people were accused, nineteen were hanged, and one was pressed to

The Salem Witch trials

2769 words - 11 pages The Salem witchcraft trials resulted from a climate of repression, religious intolerance, and social hierarchy combined with fanaticism and the oppression of women. The Puritan leaders used the trials as a way to control the community and to prevent change in the strict social hierarchy. The trials ensured that the teachings of the church would be followed anyone not following the church was simply accused of being a witch and punished

The Salem Witch Trials - 1454 words

1454 words - 6 pages besides the fact that it was the most remarkable event that occurred to all of the people living in Salem during 1692 and 1693, and that there were not really witches in Salem, only hysteria and suspicion. Works Cited Conforti, Joseph. "Salem witch trials." In Campell, Ballard C., Ph.D., gen. ed. Disasters, Accidents, and Crises in American History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2008. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 24

The Salem Witch Trials - 1329 words

1329 words - 5 pages . At the time of the Salem trials, Europe had just completed its own social purge, which, of course, had taken the form of a witch-hunt. The combination of these two arguments just so happens to be one of the most convincing. Firstly, the timing of events works out rather well. Just as Europe’s own two-century long witch-hunt ends, an American village breaks out in an epidemic of its own. Secondly, there is the matter of how quickly it spread

The Salem Witch Trials

2698 words - 11 pages asked to aid with the girls' illnesses by making a witch's cake to find their culprit and after this did not work, she was arrested four days later for being a witch herself. Each of these three women was examined by local Salem officials before they were sent off to await trial in a Boston jail. The girls, who these witches had supposedly inflicted sickness upon, were also present during these trials to show the court how much pain the three

The Salem Witch Trials Description

1548 words - 6 pages Since ancient times, the world has been plagued by the belief that witches roam freely. Witch trials have long been an iniquitous way to get rid of the presumably evil men and women who lurk throughout the deepest parts of the earth. From the beginning of time, an estimated 50 to 200 thousand people have been killed because of witch trials ; however, the most famous witch trial that ever took place was the Salem Witch Trials that occurred during

The Salem Witch Craft Trials

2167 words - 9 pages two dogs were stoned to death for collaborating with the Devil (Richardson 6).How could an entire village, including scholars, believe in witchcraft? Were these trials justified? Or were they evil, as many people think? How could respected, learned men believe the accounts of psychotics? Most importantly, could the trials have been avoided?A major cause of the Salem Witchcraft trials was superstition, an "irrational [belief] ... resulting from

The Witch Trials of Salem

823 words - 3 pages The Witch Trials of Salem Though only a seven-month “trend,” the Salem Witch Trials (SWTs) led to the executions and imprisonments of several innocent people. The SWTs were the examinations, trials, and executions of alleged “witches” beginning in late February 1692 and ending in late October 1692. The SWTs began in Salem Village, Massachusetts (currently Danvers, Massachusetts). The SWTs began with the “circle girls”: Betty Parris, Abigail

The Crucible (Salem Witch Trials)

744 words - 3 pages The Salem Witch Trials The play written by Arthur Miller, The Crucible, reveals the characters' true, private emotions and desires for each other and about themselves. The feelings that these characters had contributed to the outbreak of the witch trials in the town of Salem. For instance, the young woman, Abigail Williams, was completely in love with John Proctor who was married to Elizabeth Proctor at the time. Abigail was the

Similar Essays

The Salem Witch Trials Essay 1693 Words

1693 words - 7 pages the accused, fourteen women and five men” ; these events are known as the Salem Witch Trials. “The Salem Witch Trials happened between February of 1692 and May of 1693 in Essex, Suffolk, and Middlesex counties of colonial Massachusetts. They consisted of a series of hearings and trials that were brought before the local magistrate in order to prosecute people accused of witchcraft. More than 150 people were accused and arrested of practicing

The Salem Witch Trials Essay 2003 Words

2003 words - 8 pages The Salem Witch Trials are a series of trials to convict accused witches in the community of Salem, Massachusetts in the late 17th century. There are many causes of these trials.The setting and time period of these trials must be considered when studying the causes of the Salem Witch Trials. Salem was a religious town in Puritan Massachusetts at the time of the trials. Puritan lifestyle is very strict leaves little room for creativity or

The Salem Witch Trials Essay 981 Words

981 words - 4 pages In the year 1692, many important events occurred; Aesop’s Fables, a certain form of calculator, but may be most notably known are the Salem Witch Trials. There are multiple factors that are thought to be cause to the infamous Trials, yet religion plays a strongly dominant role amongst the plethora of reasons. The events of Salem Village affected the colonies immediately following the trials, yet they had a lasting influence on the development

The Salem Witch Trials Essay 1518 Words

1518 words - 6 pages basically revolves around the church which influenced how they lived their everyday lives. They had to go to church twice a week, attend long sermons, and avoid dancing which was deemed as a sinful act. There were events that led up to the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Europeans strongly believed in devils practice which gave certain humans the ability to harm others in return for loyalty. The Puritan life in the village of Salem was harsh because