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How Was It Tyrannical? Essay

779 words - 4 pages

Tyranny, according to the Oxford Dictionary, is “cruel, unreasonable, or arbitrary use of power or control.” Many Americans saw British policy during the late 18th century to be highly tyrannical. But many of them failed to acknowledge the presence of previous policies that the ones they were aware of actually replaced. Ensuring that previously instituted policies are enforced cannot be considered tyrannical. I agree with this view, and this essay will serve to prove that British policy was in fact reformist rather than tyrannical in the 1760’s and early 1770’s.
One of the greatest sources of misconception behind British policy during that time is that taxes and regulations were not in ...view middle of the document...

More specifically, the Act meant that any such document would incur a tax because it would require the official government stamp. Admittedly, this is the first policy Britain ever installed that sought revenues through a direct tax rather than through trade regulation; however, it was really a means for Parliament to go forth in ensuring the effects of the Navigation Acts which were never regarded the way they should have been.
A perspective I stumbled upon in my research for this paper is that even the policy itself was not tyrannical, the method of passing the policy was. The reason for this is that intricate strategy was a fundamental piece of the groundwork for its passing. The bill was passed without criticism, and passage was given when the colonies were given the option to tax themselves. Even if it was deception that was used to sway the passing of the Act, the fact is the policy was for Britain to decide and it was not the colonies' choice.
May 1773 was the next major event in terms of policymaking. Parliament passed the Tea Act, and this created quite the uproar in Boston. While it was a new act, it did not enforce new taxes; it did, however, serve...

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