Huck's Ability To Survive. Speaks Of The Character Huckleberry Finn, In Mark Twain's Novel The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1264 words - 5 pages

In literature, authors have created characters thathave traits that contributes to their survival in society.The qualities of shredders, adaptability, and basic humankindness enables the character Huckleberry Finn, in MarkTwain's novel The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn tosurvive in his environment. The purpose of this paper isto depict the importance of these traits or qualities tohis survival.Huckleberry Finn is able to confront complexsituations because he is shrewd. Nothing is more naturalor more necessary than his ability to lie. In certainsituations I will discuss how he must lie because thecircumstances forced him to deception and lies andevasions are the only weapons he has to protect himselffrom those who are physically stronger than he. Thecreativity, common sense, and understanding of people ofdifferent classes give him the edge he needs to survive ina rather harsh society.Living with Ms. Watson and Widow Douglas, Huck hasadjusted his life to that of a civilized society. Huckillustrates his shrewd thinking when he see signs thatindicates his father is back. Being afraid of his father,he gives all of his money to Judge Thatcher to avoid beingpersecuted by his father. Protecting himself was hisnumber one priority; he knew that if his father got themoney he would get drunk and in return would abuse him.His father drunkenness become a threat to his life lateron in the story and by stopping him from getting themoney, he stopped his father from being an abuser at thatpoint and time.Pap, Huck's father returns to town to get custody ofhis son because he here of Huck's fortune, finallyresorting to the kidnapping. Huck is locked in the cabinwhen Pap is not around; once he was locked up for threedays. At this point and time Huck was being neglected andabuse; his father had no idea what his abusive behaviorwas doing to Huck until he escapes. Pap became soabusive(not realizing it because of he is always drunk),that he almost kills his son in the cabin, thinking he wasthe angel of death. This incident forces Huck to realizethat his father is an immediate threat to his life and hemust escape. His plan to escape is one of common sensecombined with shrewdness and imagination. He creates abloody scene with the blood of a pig he shot, smashed thedoor, left some his hair on a bloody ax, and left a trailof food, creating the impression that he was killed byrobbers; his plan is a success.Huck must enter the world after his death indisguises, born as a new person repeatedly to conceal hisreal identity. Dressing as a girl to go ashore to gatherinformation is just one of the identities he must assumethrough out his whole journey. This example shows howingenious and innovative Huck is in creating a creditablestory that will camouflage his real identity. In the actof meeting a lady who had recently settled in town, hedresses as a girl, makes up a name and a convinciblestory, "trusting providence to put the right words in mymouth when the time come." He finds out...

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