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Huck's Struggle Between Morals. Speaks Of Huckleberry Finn" By Mark Twain

2114 words - 8 pages

In the novel "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain, the protagonist, Huck, undergoes a series of developmental changes in his character. He is often torn between the ideas of society and those of his friends. This can all be very confusing for a boy who is about 14 years old. Huck also has a drunken pap who doesn't care at all for him. Huck is then forced to live with Widow Douglas and Miss Watson. Throughout the story we see Huck represent the morals of the innocent prevailing over those of society. In his "adventures," he learns the meaning of true friendship and what's really important in life.In the story, Huck makes the decision to escape from his "family." This is a decision that goes against the morals of Huck's society, church and state. Children aren't supposed to run away from their parents. Also, his decision to help Jim escape goes against the same morals. In his "adventurous" escape down the Mississippi, he begins to feel truly free. This is a feeling that is contrasted acutely of society's "oppression" of freedom, basically when he is on land. In Jim's and Huck's escape, they are able to build their trust and friendship for each other. However, at the same time he must leave behind societies ways... getting "sivilized, money, and "family."Along Jim's and Huck's "adventure," they have many conversations along the way. These conversations consist about their freedom, money, and superstition. In the story, they both have their own opinions about various things, like Solomon."'Well, but he was the wisest man, anyway; because the widow she toldme so, her own self.''I doan' k'yer what de widder say, he warn't no wise man nuther. Hehas some er de dad-fetchedes' ways I ever see. Does you know 'bout dat chiledat he 'uz gwyne to chop in two?''Yes, the widow told me all about it.''Well, den! Warn' dat de beatenes' notion in de worl'? You jus' takeen look at it a minute. Dah's de stump, dah-dat's one er de women! heah's you-dat's de yuther one; I's Sollermun; en dish yer dollar bill's de chile. Bofe un you claims it. What does I do? Does I shin aroun' mongs' de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do b'long to, en han' it over to de right one, all safe en soun, de way dat anybody dat had any gumption would? No; I take en whack de bill in two, en give half it to you, en de yuther to de yuther women. Dat's de way Sollermum was gwyne to do wid de chile. Now I want to ast you; what's de use er dat half a billl?-can't buy noth'n wid it. En what use is a half a chile? I wouldn' give a dern for a million un um.'"As you can see from this dialogue between them, they had a distinct contrast in thinking. Huckleberry, being the young and innocent boy, believes and conforms to the ideas of Miss Watson and others of the dominant white society. Huck would believe just about anything that comes out of a white person's mouth, and argue it against the words of a "nigger." Jim on the other hand was much older and a lot smarter, for he could...

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