Huckleberry Finn Essay

901 words - 4 pages

MontagueAlana MontagueMs. LawtonEnglish 10Period 4September 29, 2014The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnFrom the very strange first introduction, I felt as if Huck was talking to me. For once, I love that the language was mangled, because that's how he spoke. How he saw the world. Through Huck's word choices; I saw his view of the world, his rather interesting relationship with honesty and his suspicion. I felt like I knew Huck like an old friend by the time the book was done.At first I wasn't really interested in reading it because I didn't seem that appealing to me. After a while I got to the point where I couldn't stop reading it. Something that got me interested in this book was that the Mississippi river symbolizes something. What I did was go on Google and look up what the Mississippi River symbolized. The Mississippi River is the ultimate symbol of Freedom. When they were alone on the raft, they didn't have to answer to anyone, they were free. Every time Huck hit land, he had all sorts of adventures that showed him and me something. There was always that escape to the river that meant that we would soon be faced with a new situation. And almost all of those adventures lead Huck to build a closer friendship with Jim. Because in the end, everything leads up to the climax where Huck has to decide whether he will help Jim escape of give him up into slavery again. The stakes here involved Jim's escape and Huck's decision with regards to that. I think he's beating himself up because he knows that what he does is wrong in his frame of reference, but I know that he isn't the sort that turns his back on a friend. I think Twain got away with murder at the end I mean, they could have been killed. I think Twain had a completely different and more tragic ending in mind, but ended up bending what he thought the readers would want. Perhaps what I learned most is that Twain strived to create characters that creep so deep into readers' hearts that they don't mind the imperfections so much.Huck Finn grows and learns many lessons. Throughout my life I have learned many similar lessons. I have discovered that there is a relationship between Huck's life lessons and my life lessons. Twain's character, Huckleberry Finn, and I can be compared and contrasted through lessons we both have learned and lessons that only I have learned. During my life I have learned that lessons are hard, complex, and above all else are...

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