This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Huckleberry Finn Conflict Between Society And The Individual

747 words - 3 pages

The theme of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn is that the ideas of society can greatly influence the individual, and sometimes the individual must break off from the accepted values of society to determine the ultimate truth for himself. In Huckleberry Finn's world, society has corrupted justice and morality to fit the needs of the people of the nation at that time. Basically, Americans were justifying slavery, through whatever social or religious ways that they deemed necessary during this time.

The conflict between society and Huckleberry Finn results from Huck's non-conformist attitude. This attitude is a result of his separation from society at an early age. With a highly abusive drunkard for a father, Huckleberry Finn is forced from childhood to rely solely on himself. As a result of this, he effectively alienates himself from the rest of society. Society continues to try to "reform" him, but Huckleberry Finn shows his lack of appreciation in that effort from the very beginning of the story when he says, "The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me I got into my old rags and my sugar hogshead again, and was free and satisfied." His actions are based on instinct and his own experience, rather than conventional conscience. As a result, he makes up the rules for himself as he goes along, forming a conscience that is keenly aware of society's prejudices but actions based on that which he has experienced.

Ironically, often his own instincts hold him to a higher moral standard than those of society. His decision to help free Jim, a slave, is an example of one such instance. Huckleberry Finn recognizes Jim as a human being, but is fighting the beliefs bestowed upon him by a society that believes slaves should not be free. However, it is important to realize that although Huckleberry Finn's decisions create the conflict between society and himself (and that this conflict forms the theme of the novel), Huck is oblivious to the justice, the righteousness, and even the heroism of his own actions, they are simply in accordance with his own conscience.

The climax comes in chapter thirty-one of the novel, when...

Find Another Essay On Huckleberry Finn - Conflict Between Society And The Individual

Society and Morality in Huckleberry Finn and The Great Gatsby

1363 words - 5 pages Roaring Twenties, also focused his writing on society. His highly acclaimed novel, The Great Gatsby, explores the social climate of the 1920's, commenting on the same issues Twain documented in Huckleberry Finn, updated and refurnished for a modern generation.The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is best known as a social commentary--Clemens's sardonic view of society guised as an innocent adventure novel. Through careful observation Twain gained insight

The Struggle Between Freedom and Slavery in Huckleberry Finn

396 words - 2 pages "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", by Mark Twain, is a classic American novel, considered by some to be the finest example of American literature. It follows Huck and Jim, a poor Southern white boy and a runaway slave, as they travel down the Mississippi River in a quest for freedom. Sometimes regarded as a simple children's story, "Huckleberry Finn", while still existing on that level, also has an abundance of symbolism and meaning that's

The Contrast Between Land and Water in Huckleberry Finn

932 words - 4 pages In Huck Finn, Huck and his companions travel through the Mississippi river and are able to experience free will. Their voyage through the expansive body of water has multiple meanings, as the river embodies the growth of the young and impressionable product of society- Huck.Prior to his adventures in the river, Huck led an almost normal childhood. Like other children, he grew in a cruel, racist society, where the belief that the white race was

Society in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1700 words - 7 pages Society in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Sometimes making a stand for what is right, especially when it is totally against the customary beliefs of your society, is not an easy accomplishment. In the novel Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, the main character Huck encounters many situations where there is a question of morality. Considering the traditional protocol of his society, Huck has to choose either what his conscience feels is

The Development of Individual Conscience in Twain's Huckleberry Finn

1633 words - 7 pages In the novel, individual conscience plays a big role on the lives of the characters. Throughout the novel, Jim and Huck help each other to find their true identities through their journey down the river, although they are both very different, in social class, race, and view on society and the world, they are able to form a father-son relationship in which Huck is able to mature and grow his conscience. Jim is able to mold Huck’s conscience into

Huckleberry Finn - Huck Verses Society

1367 words - 5 pages opposite of Huckleberry Finn. Throughout Huckleberry Finn, Huck is pitted against society's influence in his encounters with the strange, stereotypical people he meets along the Mississippi River. These people reflect many common social values, such as conformity, racism, and negligence of nightmares and frightening images; Huck, however, uses his individualism to avoid the cloud of society, relying on his instincts to guide him through life and

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and its Relation to Society Today

878 words - 4 pages issues that are addressed include: Huckleberry’s growth as a moral and upstanding person, race relations between African-Americans and Caucasian-Americans including Huck’s relation to Jim and the issue of slavery, the role of society and an analysis of Huck’s role in society and society’s role in Huckleberry’s personality. In the book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the protagonist is faced with many moral dilemmas. Huckleberry Finn is

Human Nature and society presented through Huckleberry Finn

888 words - 4 pages Human Nature and Society presented through Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain opposed many of the ideologies of his time. Through his novel Huckleberry Finn, he explored human nature and the society. He made apparent his dislike for them. The book focus’s on the general treatment of black people during this time. Specifically, the author criticizes morality, slavery and racism. The characters encountered in Huckleberry Finn do not have very high

Demoralizing Society and Regionalism in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

951 words - 4 pages he uses that exemplifies the country as a whole. Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, falls into the regionalism category because of its universal themes of slavery, morals, and society. Huck Finn was set in the Old South near the Mississippi River where slavery was still in effect. The whites treated African Americans poorly by calling them names, giving them poor living conditions, and lack of freedom. Slavery and racism

Gatsby versus Huckleberry Finn: A Battle between the Two “Greatest”

2867 words - 12 pages between them, are habitually not put together as being common tales with common literary elements shared between them; however, this opinion can be refuted. There are similarities between The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Great Gatsby on such literary devices as theme, archetypes, characterizations, and similarities on the origins from which their settings came from. The shared themes in both stories are on morality, society and class

The Changing Relationship Between Individual and Society in Modern Drama

4379 words - 18 pages , however, need not necessarily follow the current sways of politics or the en vogue intellectuals, they write what they believe is the most valuable message to mankind; theirs is the role of observing, criticising and evaluating. A common theme visited by playwrights in modern drama, was the question of the relationship between the individual, and the society in which he lived. The Norwegian playwright, Henrik Ibsen, who wrote in the last half of

Similar Essays

Individual Versus Society In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1463 words - 6 pages ; Mark Twain himself was different from the rest of the society at his time. Throughout the novel, Twain illustrates the struggle between individual and society using the character, Huckleberry Finn. Slavery was an institution accepted by the society. People owned, sold, traded and exploited slaves every day. Jim manages to run away from Miss Watson, and Huck manages to runaway from Pap. Twain uses this to show us that they both ran away from

Huckleberry Finn And The Devilish Society

1196 words - 5 pages At the start of the book “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain” Huck is an ordinary southern teenager who enjoys pranks, hates school and dislikes any type of authority. Early in the story he and his friend Tom found treasure worth thousands of dollars which he splits with his friend and has a judge distribute to him daily ($ 1 a day). With his new acquired wealth he is adopted by a widow who promises to have Huck as her adoptive son

The Relationship Between Huckleberry Finn And Jim In Mark Twain's "The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn"

2036 words - 8 pages The relationship between Huckleberry Finn and Jim are central to Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Huck's relationships with individual characters are unique in their own way; however, his relationship with Jim is one that is ever changing and sincere. As a poor, uneducated boy, Huck distrusts the morals and intentions of the society that treats him as an outcast and fails to protect him from abuse. The uneasiness about society

Conflict In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1394 words - 6 pages celebration of American ideals rather than a criticism of American society. While Twain satirizes the absurdity and hypocrisy of some common social institutions, he mainly focuses on Huck himself. Twain's portrayal of Huck's struggles and conflict, even though it is against his own society, and his experiences in living, gaining a better understanding of the world along the way, is what makes Huck Finn a classic American novel.Bibliography:Twain, Mark. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: with Connections. Austin: Holt, Rinehart andWinston. Print.