This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Huckleberry Finn ( Huck Finn ) Maturation

1193 words - 5 pages

Huck's Journey Through Maturation

Mark Twain's novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is based on a young boy's coming of age in Missouri in the mid-1800s. The adventures Huck Finn gets into while floating down the Mississippi River depict many serious issues that occur on the shores of civilization, better known as society. As these events following the Civil War are told through the young eyes of Huckleberry Finn, he unknowingly develops morally from the influences surrounding him on his journey to freedom and in the end, becomes a mature individual.

Huck's evolution begins before he ever sets foot on the raft down the Mississippi. His mother is deceased, while his father customarily is in a drunken state. Huck grows up following his own rules until he moves in with the Widow Douglas and her sister, Miss Watson. Together, the women attempt to "sivilize"(Twain, 3). Huck by making him attend school, study religion, and act in a way the women find socially acceptable. However, Huck's free-spirited soul keeps him from joining the organized life the two women have in store for him. The freedom Huck seeks in Tom Sawyer's gang is nothing more than romantic child's-play. Raiding a caravan of Arabs really means terrorizing young children on a Sunday School picnic, and the stolen "julery"(12) is nothing more than turnips or rocks. Huck is disappointed that the adventures Tom promises are not real and so, along with the other members, he quits the gang. Still, Huck ignorantly assumes that Tom is superior to him because of his more suitable family background and fascination with Romantic literature.

Pap and "the kidnapping" play another big role in Huck's moral development. Pap is completely antisocial and wishes to undo all of the bad things that the Widow and Miss Watson have attempted to instill in Huck. However, Pap does not symbolize freedom because he promotes drunkenness, prejudice, and abuse.

So, Huck escapes the cabin to search for the freedom of which he is in need. It is after Huck Finn escapes to Jackson Island that he meets the most influential character of the novel, Jim. After conversing, Huck learns things about the runaway slave of which he had never been aware. Jim has a family, dreams, and talents such as knowing "all kinds of signs"(40), people's personalities, and weather forecasting. However, Huck sees Jim as a gullible slave. He plays tricks on him like the rattlesnake that he puts in Jim's bed that nearly gets Jim killed. At this point in the novel, Huck still holds the belief that blacks are essentially different from whites. Also, Huck's conscience constantly reminds him that he is an abolitionist for helping Jim run away from his owner. Huck does not see that Jim is looking for freedom just as he is.

The first adventure Huck and Jim take part in while searching for freedom is the steamboat situation. Huck shows development of character in tricking the watchman into going back to the boat...

Find Another Essay On Huckleberry Finn ( Huck Finn ) - Maturation

Characteristic of Huck Finn in Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

791 words - 3 pages Huckleberry Finn, the main character, learns he must grow up fast if he wants to survive life. Huck Finnhas a drunkard as a father, a hogshead as a home, and a mother (dead ) of which he never knew. He is acongenital liar, a thief, and someone who has no respect for the rules of society. He will use every technicalityto get off with doing something completely wrong, but is ok by him. Huck is not all evil as one would think bythis introduction

Huck Finn Essay

913 words - 4 pages In several instances, Huck Finn has showed his ability to take hold of a situation.In the novel Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, Huck an adventurous, street mart, yet daring individual illustrates his capability of handling tough problems. Huck, a model bold swimmer, deals with such issues as child abuse, stealing, and discrimination. Huck, while not afraid to get in trouble, also knows where to draw the line. Huck Finn is very much self

Huck Finn as the Narrator in Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

767 words - 3 pages Mark Twain chose Huck Finn to be the narrator to make the story more realistic and so that Mark Twain could get the reader to examine their own attitudes and beliefs by comparing themselves to Huck, a simple uneducated character.Twain was limited in expressing his thoughts by the fact that Huck Finn is a living, breathing person who is telling the story. Since the book is written in first person, Twain had to put himself in the place of a

Huck Finn

1557 words - 6 pages Huck Finn Throughout the ages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has been a treasured novel to people of all ages. For young adults the pure adventuresome properties of the book captivates and inspires wild journeys into the unknown. The book appeals to them only as a quest filled with danger and narrow escapes. It is widely considered “that children of 12 or so are a little too young to absorb the book’s complexities” (Galileo

Huck Finn

939 words - 4 pages Huckleberry Finn            The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of the greatest, most daring novels in the world. Mark Twain’s style helps to realistically portray early America. Mark Twain tells the story through the voice of Huck, the very kindhearted main character. Everything that Huck says reflects the racism and black stereotypes typical of the era. This has lead to many conflicts

Huck Finn

1363 words - 5 pages because he is able to escape the unnecessary necessities of society and be a free individual, rather than conforming to ways of life that he does not see fit. Mark Twain, in his novel Huckleberry Finn, makes evident the diversion of Huck and Jim's experiences: restriction, feuds, and oppression on land, and adventure, safety, and freedom on the raft.In the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck and Jim face restriction when they are on land, while life

Huck Finn

946 words - 4 pages Huck Finn I recently read the book Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. This story deals Mainly with a lost boy escaping his harsh existence, and a slave trying to reach freedom. During the course of this book, the slave Jim, and the Boy Huck Bond with each other. I enjoyed this book immensely for a couple different reasons. While I liked the story, and the plot kept me interested, the real reason I found myself enjoying this book so much

Huck Finn

856 words - 4 pages Are humans naturally good, or evil? Many people argue both ways. It has been argued for centuries, and many authors have written about it. One example of this is Samuel Clemens's, more commonly known as Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The book follows a young boy, named Huckleberry, and a runaway slave, named Jim, as they both run away. Huck runs away to escape being civilized, while Jim runs away from slavery. Together, they

Huck FInn

1331 words - 6 pages ultimately cause harm onto others. Not only is his book actually morally good, and the usage of his questioning words was to provide simple messages to those that hear it: Sources Page Gribben: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/jan/05/huckleberry-finn-edition-censors-n-word Huck Finn- When Great Books Were Fun: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/schaeffersghost/2012/08/huck-finn-when-great-books-were-fun/ The effects on teachers: http

Huck Finn - 581 words

581 words - 2 pages Two people taking a trip down a river, is rarely thought of as anything more than just an adventure. Mark Twain, however, uses his novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, to explore and makes fun of many problems facing American society. Huck, the main character, is considered a boy who is under pressure to conform to the aspects of society. Jim, who comes along with Huck, is a runaway slave seeking freedom from the world that has been

Huck Finn - 2498 words

2498 words - 10 pages they are, of what comes with this thing we call humanity. That is Mark twain's main purpose in writing this novel. The Battle of Huck      In Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Huck faces the dilemma of embracing the discriminatory ideology of the South as he simultaneously combats his inner consciousness. Searching for a better way of life, both Huck, a freedom seeking youth, and Jim, a runaway slave, set off downriver

Similar Essays

Huckleberry Finn ( Huck Finn ) Racism

584 words - 2 pages Huck Finn Racism Is Huck Finn A Racist Book? Ever since its publication over a hundred years ago, controversy has swarmed around one of Mark Twain’s most popular novels, Huck Finn. Even then, many educators supported its dismissal from school libraries. For post Civil-War Americans, the argument stemmed from Twain’s use of spelling errors, poor grammar, and curse words. In the politically correct 1990’s however, the point of argument

The Maturation Of Huckleberry Finn Essay

921 words - 4 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins with Huck introducing himself. He is wild and carefree, playing jokes on people and believing them all to be hilarious. When his adventures grow to involve new moral questions never before raised, there is a drastic change in his opinions, thoughts, and his views of "right and wrong", and Huck's "rejection of the values of society has tried to instill in him" (Wright 154). By the

Huckleberry Finn Huck Verses Society

1367 words - 5 pages opposite of Huckleberry Finn. Throughout Huckleberry Finn, Huck is pitted against society's influence in his encounters with the strange, stereotypical people he meets along the Mississippi River. These people reflect many common social values, such as conformity, racism, and negligence of nightmares and frightening images; Huck, however, uses his individualism to avoid the cloud of society, relying on his instincts to guide him through life and

"Huckleberry Finn" By Mark Twain: Racism In Huck Finn

979 words - 4 pages Many people think that Huckleberry Finn is a racist novel and they have even gone as far as banning the novel from certain schools. They base this view on the fact that the word "nigger" is used very often and they see the black people being portrayed in a degrading way to show that they are inferior to the white society. Contrary to this idea, Huckleberry Finn is not a racist novel. Mark Twain actually attacks racism by satirizing the lifestyle