Huckleberry Finn Written By Mark Twain (Samuel Clemmons).

1324 words - 5 pages

Moral Growth of Huckleberry FinnThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a novel by Mark Twain and the sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, takes place along the Mississippi River during the late 1830s. Huckleberry Finn stages his death to escape his abusive, alcoholic father. While he is away, Jim, a black man, catches up to him, and they become friends. Society's view of blacks is that they are inferior to whites, and to help blacks is against the law. Jim is running away because he overheard that he was being sold to an owner in New Orleans. Huck and Jim are traveling along the Mississippi River to Cairo, hoping to buy steamboat tickets and get to the free states. Along the way, they run into a couple of con artists and they refuse to allow Jim and Huck to follow out with their plan while they are all together. Huck's morality grows throughout the novel, from Huck doing what society has taught him to do towards blacks, to going against the lessons of society and doing what he feels is right.Huck's moral situations start at Jackson's Island when Huck and Jim meet there. Huck wonders why Jim is there with him, Jim says, "Well dey's reasons. But you wouldn't tell on me ef I 'uz to tell you, would you, Huck?" Huck then says, "Blamed if I would, Jim" (34). He doesn't tell on Jim even though society has taught him to tell someone about runaway slaves. Next, when Huck put a dead snake in Jim's blanket, and calls himself a fool for doing it because the mate will come and curl around it. " I made up my mind I wouldn't ever take aholt of a snake-skin again with my hands, now that I see what had come of it" (43), says Huck. He says this because he saw that this prank hurt somebody he cares for, and he doesn't want to hurt his friends. Then, Huck finds out that Jim is wanted for murder, and there are people looking for him. "There Jim laid, sound asleep on the ground. I roused him out and says; 'Git up and hump yourself, Jim! There ain't a minute to lose. They're after us!" (50). Huck says this because he is just as worried for Jim as he is for himself. On Jackson's Island Huck knows that Jim needs someone to help him because he won't be able to get to the free states by himself, so Huck stays with him and promises to help Jim to get free.His next moral situations are while they are on the river Huck and Jim stumble upon a half-sunken steamboat. Huck finds out that the people on the boat are murderers. Huck and Jim escape the steamboat as it is sinking, but the murderers are trapped inside. It looks like they will drown. As Huck and Jim go down river, they decide to stop and get help for the murderers, and Huck makes up a story about his family and says, 'They're in an awful peck of trouble, and --' 'Who is?', says the boat watchman. 'Why, pop and mam, and sis, and Miss Hooker; and if you'd take your ferry-boat and go up there--, on the wreck' (59). "Well before long, here comes the wreck, dim and dusky, sliding along down! A kind of cold shiver went...

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