Human Nature Explored In Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde

485 words - 2 pages

Human Nature Explored in Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Stevenson gives the impression that human nature is a constant battle
between good and evil. His upbringing as a Calvinist has had a big
impact on how he sees human nature and how it is portrayed in the book
.It is a very complex view of human nature, as Stevenson doesn’t see
anybody as particularly evil or good, more which impulses of human
nature are overwhelming the body.

Human nature in the book has many contradictory points in the novel.
For instance, Dr.Jekyll is the most contradictory character in the
novel, because of Mr.Hyde being in the equation. Dr.Jekyll is the kind
and good side of the two. Mr.Hyde is the nasty and evil side of the
two. He shows contradictions in other characters too, like Mr.Enfield
and Mr.Utterson being good friends when their characteristics are the
complete opposite .For instance Mr.Utterson was a man about town
always in brothels till the early hours of the morning, Mr.Enfield on
the other hand stopped himself from drinking wine because he didn’t
want to indulge in his pleasures.

Back in Victorian times reputation was possibly one of the most
important aspects of a person. For example, when Mr.Utterson caught
Mr.Hyde after trampling over the little girl, Mr.Hyde was willing to
pay up to £100, which in today’s money would be thousands of pounds
just so that he could avoid publicity. This shows that Stevenson
believes that human nature human...

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