Human Nature Exposed In The Single Most Important Piece Of American Literature, The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Twain

1418 words - 6 pages

More than a century ago, Mark Twain probably composed the single-most important piece of American Literature to ever be composed. This work, widely known as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, essentially follows young Huck on a series of adventures and experiences with his close friend (and runaway slave), Jim, as they both escape society's burdens. The novel, in a sense, encompasses everything good, bad and in between about and concerning the society of that time. A majority of the novel takes place along the Mississippi river, with Young Huck, and Jim each striving to attain a common goal, freedom from the woes of society. In their journey, they come across many different people, and encounter many strange and new experiences that all relate to a common theme that is evident throughout the novel. As their journey progresses, the reader witnesses many horrific and surprising acts, all performed by none other than man himself. Looking deeper into the symbolistic meaning of many of these passages reveals that man, in essence , is cruel, silly, and hypocritical in nature.Through his writing, it becomes apparent that Twain supports the thematic idea of the human race being hypocritical. For instance, take the scene in Chapter 20 where a group of people in Arkansas are listening to the sermon of a preacher. In this descriptive passage, it can be inferred through Twain's writing that the average person of this time was in fact 'blinded' by religious influences. The significance of this event can be observed later on in Chapter 21 where Twain describes the horrific abuse of animals. 'There couldn't anything wake them up all over, and make them happy all over, like a dog-fight--unless it might be putting turpentine on a stray dog and setting fire to him...' (Twain 140). In putting the two preceding passages in perspective a distinctive irony becomes visible. The same type of individuals whom practice religion in good faith turn around and perform cruel acts to animals, for sport of all things. This is hypocritical because the basis of religion is definitely not to support or defendCannistra 2such acts, but that doesn't seem to have any adverse affect upon the average personwho is merely 'blinded' by glamour of religion and what it stands for, not having any intention of carrying out it's plight. So all said and done, Twain wanted to make it clear to the reader in a subtle way that these two scenes, in conjunction support the statement that Twain's writing makes the human race out as hypocritical in nature.In addition of Twain using the experiences that Huck and Jim undergo to illustrate that man is hypocritical, he uses these experiences to show us that man is cruel and savage as well. Take, for instance this quote from Huck after he witnesses the massacre of the Grangerfords by the Shepardsons. 'It made me so sick I most fell out of the tree. I ain't a-going to tell all that happened--it would make me sick again if i was to do that' (Twain 115). That...

Find Another Essay On Human Nature exposed in the single-most important piece of American Literature, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Twain

Symbolism in “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain

808 words - 3 pages Rivers flow freely and calmly, and people usually go to the river to get away from the hectic world around them. With nature surrounding them, people can find peace and quietness. The Mississippi River is the largest river in the United States. It’s length and width, along with its fast flowing current, makes it an ideal scene to escape civilization. In “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain, the two main characters, Huck and Jim

Crimes in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

2322 words - 10 pages Elena Megaludis Mr. Octun Honors English 11 18 December 2011 Throughout the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn there are numerous crimes. The violence of these crimes is described vividly by Huck, the narrator, which shows their impact upon him. By showing Huck's shock over these events, Twain is showing that there is no real justice in the South, except for the hollow and often inappropriate excess found attempts to obtain personal

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain transports the

1375 words - 6 pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain transports the reader back in time giving a unique perspective of the world. Huck Finn is a wild, uneducated adolescent who by chance came into a large sum of money. Huck is constantly searching for a place where he feels free. He's not looking for trouble, but somehow trouble always finds him. Throughout the story, Huck is haunted by the ever present bad influence of his friend, Tom Sawyer. Huck

"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain

1340 words - 5 pages clearest example in our history of the adaptation of a folk art to serious literary uses. Mark Twain, in short, who as a personality could not help but be a humorist, as a literary artist whose works were channeled by such currents, could not help but be an American humorist. His works are, in a sense, a summary of nineteenth-century native American humor."The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" is a book, rare in our literature, which manages to

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1919 words - 8 pages still remained embedded in the minds of thousands of Americans. In 1884, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, was published. The book tells the adventures of a boy, Huckleberry Finn, while he helps free a slave, Jim. Throughout the narrative, young Huck faces multiple dilemmas over the issue of slavery and racism; ultimately, he continues to help Jim escape though he is faced with constant opposition to that decision. In

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1463 words - 6 pages answers and background information about one of his best works, “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”, which was often regarded as the “Great American Novel”. Probably the most important information in the autobiography is that almost all of the characters were inspired by people who Twain met in his life. This is the biggest evidence that this book isn’t just a simple work, but also an illustration of literature and culture that time. Despite the

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1512 words - 6 pages Douglas owned. They become friends and travel down the river together. From this point Jim gets sold back into slavery and Huck and Tom try to get him out. This novel has so many scenes that change the course of story line that it is hard to pick out which ones would be the most important. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain the three most important scenes are when Huck is taken captive by his father, when Huck finds Jim, and when Huck

Overview: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

2623 words - 10 pages , and our literature. Indeed, it is evident that Mark Twain, the author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, attempted to create a parallel to the biblical story of Moses. Huckleberry Finn exhibits strong parallels to the story of Moses; these parallels include the important role that the rivers played in the start of the protagonists’ respective origins and escape from their respective father-figures, their being plucked from the river and

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

1968 words - 8 pages Reading: The Burden of Huckleberry Finn." Canadian Review of American Studies 29.1 (1999): 13-48. Rpt. in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Ed. Janet Witalec. Vol. 138. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Literature Resource Center. Web. 20 Nov. 2013. Mason, Ernest D. "Attraction and Repulsion: Huck Finn 'Nigger' Jim, and Black Americans." CLA Journal 33 (Sept. 1989): 36-48. Rpt. in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Ed. Thomas J. Schoenberg and Lawrence J. Trudeau. Vol. 161. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resource Center. Web. 20 Nov. 2013. Twain, Mark, and Donald McKay. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1948. Print.

"The adventures of huckleberry finn" by Mark Twain

531 words - 2 pages Mark Twain wrote the novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It spans approximately 240 pages and was chosen because it is part of the eleventh grade curriculum.The book begins and takes place in St. Petersburg, Missouri, along the Mississippi River; the setting later changes depending on how far down the river they go. The time frame is the early to mid-nineteenth century. The main character, for which the book is named, is Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain - 1253 words

1253 words - 5 pages because Huck can see this injustice in his rural community and in the country at large. Mark Twain, the author of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, once said that “Just because you’re taught that something’s right and everyone believes it’s right, it don’t make it right.” People were given minds and the ability to form their own thoughts and opinions. During the mid -1800’s, it didn’t appear that many people were

Similar Essays

Huck Finn: Should It Be Taught In American Literature Mark Twain, The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1331 words - 6 pages Huck Finn: Should it be taught in American Literature?Throughout the years, few books have been as highly debated and criticized as Mark Twain's 1885 novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The book's controversies are still heavily debated today. Many schools have gone as far as to ban this book from high school reading lists, despite its strong display of realism. However, this novel is a historical piece of literature and should not be

Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

4472 words - 18 pages Famed novelist Ernest Hemingway believed that “[a]ll modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn…the best book we’ve had.” The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a classic American tale with all the essentials of a story that feeds our imagination. On the surface, the novel appears to be a very unpretentious tale of adventure, and self-discovery that has earned a place on every high school required

Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

1176 words - 5 pages own faith and make their own decisions. The most important part of free will is that people are able to construct their own opinions on what they believe. The book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, most commonly known as Huck Finn, has had many speculations and controversies over it, and a lot of strong opinions about it have been made regarding it. An editorial from 1982, from the Washington Post states its own views about the book: The

Racism In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

1307 words - 6 pages protects Jim too. If Huck Finn was a racist book Huck and Jim wouldn’t have the friendship they have in the story. In the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain should still be taught in schools because it is not a not a racist book and it is important to be taught in school because it teaches students the reality of what happened during the pre-civil war times. Another reason why is it should still be taught in school is because if