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Human Relations In Camus' Novel, The Outsider, From An Existentialist View

2218 words - 9 pages

Human relations are very important for any human, and differ from one age to another because of the emerging of different movements across time. The human relations with God, love, society, death etc… are relations that human make to live his life. I study in this paper the human relations in The Outsider novel by Albert Camus from an existentialist view. I want to study Meursault relations who is the main character in Albert Camus’s novel The Outsider , Meursault is being executed because he kills an arab person, but the main reason is that he does not cry at his mother’ funeral and lives his life as there is nothing happened, he goes in the next day to swim and he makes love with his friend Marie and also watch a film. The philosophers and critics considers Meursault as he is authentic to himself , and Buber argued that authentic existence was impossible without a serious relationship with other persons.

Existentialism according to Ian Craib “is notoriously difficult to define and even those writers covered by the term do not always acknowledge it. According to Simone de Beauvoir ( 1968: 45 – 6 ) “ … we took the epithet that everyone used for us and used it to our own purposes.’ “ ( Craib 1 )

Although, there was a problem in defining the existentialism because of different ideas and different use by the writers we can define it as a philosophical and literary tendency that typically displays a dismissal of abstract theories that seek to disguise the untidiness of actual human lives and emphasizes the subjective realities of individual existence, individual freedom, and individual choice. It is virtually impossible to define absolutely as it is now so broad in its approaches but some of its major strands can be outlined.

There is an emphasis on each person finding their own way in life, on making choices, (including, in particular, all serious and momentous life-choices), for oneself as one sees fit without reliance on external standards or practice. This tendency to effectively deny that there is an acceptable basis for moral decision making diverges markedly from an earlier, and often largely unquestioned faith-related, emphasis that there could be, and indeed were, moral standards to which all might beneficially conform.

Because of the big differences between authors we must find some common ideas or interests as Mary Warnock did “we can say that the common interest which unites Existentialists philosophers is the interest in human freedom. They are all of them interested in the world considered as the environment of man, who is treated as a unique object of attention, because of his power to choose his own courses of action”(Warnock,1) and there is a psychology for the existentialism which has many principles, For Sartre the principle of the existentialist psychoanalysis is “that man is a totality and not a collection.” (Sartre, 68) and Sartre said that “Man is nothing else but that which he makes of...

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