Human Rights Of Indigenous Australians Essay

732 words - 3 pages

Human rights are the inborn and universal rights of every human being regardless of religion, class, gender, culture, age, ability or nationality, that ensure basic freedom and dignity. In order to live a life with self-respect and dignity basic human rights are required.
“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.” (Article 2, Declaration of Human Rights, )
Human rights have been developing as a concept throughout the history of humans. Human rights have been present in several nations throughout history including in Ancient Greece as Natural Law, 1689 in the English Bill of Rights, 1776 in the American Declaration of Independence and 1788 in the French Revolution’s Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen. It was not until recently in 1948 that the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights was created as an international concept in response to the genocide of European Jews by Hitler.
Overall Australia’s human rights record is of high-quality but is blemished by few human rights violations. Australia has freedom of speech, a corruption-free legal system, legal protection against discrimination, access to secondary education, the right to vote in elections, access to clean water, privacy protection, freedom of religion, etc. The establishment of the United Nations in 1948 saw Australia committed to the endorsement of human rights. The Australian Government has protected and promoted the human rights of Australian citizens. Despite Australia having a better human rights record than many other countries it does however have a number of human rights abuses including the treatment and position of Indigenous Australians in society.
Across the world, Indigenous people of all countries have been removed from their lands and exploited and oppressed. Indigenous people across the world have suffered greatly from various issues. The United Nations has created the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007 in response to the continuous human rights abuses faced...

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