Hume's Ideas Present In Harrison Bergeron

849 words - 4 pages

Upon further analysis of Kurt Vonnegut's, "Harrison Bergeron", evidence suggests that the story imitates the basic structure of the monomyth. However, unlike the sequence and obvious events presented in a monomyth Vonnegut cleverly applies his own unique play on the iconic structure. What is to be noted first is the definition of amonomyth. Joseph Campbell defines the term, "monomyth", as the standard cycle of events that occur to which the hero endures during the progression of the story (kfjakhfakjf). This is a common format for various works of literature (hfakhfke). Important phases of the monomyth are as follows: 1)separation 2)initiation 3)return, all of which have countless endeavors ...view middle of the document...

In simpler terms the character's return is not a happy one, but depressing even though they went through the entire journey to acquire more wisdom and knowledge of themselves.
Take into consideration Vonnegut's literary work in "Harrison Bergeron" as affirmation for Hume's claim. The story conveys a society where everyone is equal in the sense that if anyone were to show signs of superiority they would ultimately be subject to an inhibitor. For example, if you were too pretty you are forced to wear a mask to hide any sign of beauty. Equality in every aspect is the mindset of Vonnegut's story "Harrison Bergeron." The society resembled communism just at extreme levels. It may not seem as though there is a hero based on the progression of the story, but it is evident that Harrison Bergeron is the one to hand the title to. Harrison possesses qualities beyond the average individual in the story: intelligence, athleticism, overall greatness, enough to be a true leader in the society:"'He is a genius and an athlete, is under-handicapped, and should be regarded as extremely dangerous" (Vonnegut, 219). But because of the way society runs in this story; he is viewed as a threat and therefore is a victim of punishment by law. After complete isolation from the entire world and from his family, Harrison uses his special qualities to his advantage. He escapes to return to his hometown in order to change the entire atmosphere of the society he used to live in. He wants everyone to rid of ...

Find Another Essay On Hume's Ideas Present In Harrison Bergeron

Utopia and Dystopia in Harrison Bergeron and The Lottery

1479 words - 6 pages distinctive contrast in The Lottery and Harrison Bergeron is information, independent thought, and freedom are restricted. This is one of the most incessantly compelling characteristics present in Harrison Bergeron because of the extremity of the dystopia. An example of this displayed in the narrative is indicated in the quote, “Hazel had a perfectly average intelligence, which meant she couldn't think about anything except in short bursts

Equality's Dark Side in The Uknown Citizen and Harrison Bergeron

1808 words - 7 pages When Society is too Equal in The Uknown Citizen and Harrison Bergeron W. H. Auden's poem entitled "The Unknown Citizen" and Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.'s short story entitled "Harrison Bergeron" is a portrayal of a conflict between individualism and government control. Auden's "The Unknown Citizen" is a government's view of the perfect modern man in an unrealistic society. Similarly, Vonnegut presents in "Harrison Bergeron" a scary and destructive

The Dangers of Total Equality in “Harrison Bergeron”

910 words - 4 pages Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.’s “Harrison Bergeron” tells the story of an unbelievably talented young man that defies the constraints of total equality in futuristic America, year 2081. Because of the 211th, 212th, and 213th amendments, all citizens are subjected to a communist like state where everyone is made to be equal in beauty, physique, and intelligence. Throughout “Harrison Bergeron,” symbols such as Harrison’s defiance of the law, his physical

The Desire to Change One's Self in Harrison Bergeron

631 words - 3 pages to be better as a person. For example, in the story "Harrison Bergeron" it exemplifies how our society in the future have to be average. Furthermore, the law degrades some people for being better looking or advanced intellectually in order to make everybody equally provided with. Therefore, the law creates a method that equalize people. Also, they enforce "handicaps" so nobody would have the typical insecurities about themselves because everybody

Social Independence and Prejudice in Harrison Bergeron and V for Vendetta

1749 words - 7 pages Harrison Bergeron is a story that depicts a society whereby everyone is equal mentally, physically and socially. The people were forced to wear handicaps, masks, weights and headsets in order to be equal with each other in the society. V for Vendetta is a 2005 action packed film by James McTeigue which presents a society that is controlled by the government. The film and the story present dystopian societies and both are stories of the future

Kurt Vonnegut's "Harrison Bergeron" -- A story symbolic of the oppression inherent in society, and the depths to which it pervades our lives through the media, politics, and popular culture

1494 words - 6 pages The first time I read Kurt Vonnegut Jr.'s "Harrison Bergeron", I was a freshman at community college. After a quick skim, I took it to be yet another short story about a perverse kind of utopian society sacrificing some basic human right or another in order to keep the peace. I was then compelled to read it again after watching Bruce Pittman's movie adaptation of the story on television. After reading the story a second time, and a third, and

Compare the ways in which poets present their ideas and attitudes in

965 words - 4 pages Compare the ways in which poets present their ideas and attitudes in Vultures and Limbo. · Limbo In this poem, Edward Kamau Brathwaite uses the game Limbo and limbo dancing to represent his memories of the slave trade. The poet uses the limbo stick to describe the action of the slaves: the stick is lowered towards the ground - the slaves are being forced down into the holds of the ship, becoming more down trodden as their lives are

Compare how poets present ideas about conflict from different perspectives in Hawk Roosting and Futility

579 words - 2 pages Compare how poets present ideas about conflict from different perspectives in Hawk Roosting and FutilityIn Hawk Roosting, the voice believes that it has the ability and right to decide whether other animals should live or die, saying 'I kill where I please because it is all mine'. In this poem there is a sense of pride, in that the voice is proud of its power. The voice of the poem could represent different things: a sniper used in war, or a

What Ideas about Leadership does Shakespeare present in the first 3 Acts of Henry V?

886 words - 4 pages What Ideas about Leadership does Shakespeare Present in the First 3 Acts of Henry V?In Henry V, Shakespeare conveys certain characteristics and relationships that are key to leadership. A leader may have to be ruthless, especially at Henry's time. In the 1400s, when Henry V lived, kings were expected to be there at the front lines with their men, and to lead armies with a ruthlessness that will help them win wars. Shakespeare presents Henry's

Compare and Contrast the Way in Which Poets Present Ideas About Soldiers Leaving for War in Joining the Colours and The Send Off

1053 words - 4 pages The writers of 'Joining the Colours' and 'The Send Off' both use poetry to express their feelings about soldiers leaving for war. Each have similar attitudes about the subject, but use different approaches to try and get their message across. Both question the popular concept of war, including ideas such as heroism and glory. Katherine Hinkson, the poet who wrote 'Joining the Colours', shows the scene from two different perspectives, that of the

hARRISON BERGERON

925 words - 4 pages Harrison Bergeron Would a regular citizen enjoy being as skilled of a dancer as a ballerina? Or as intelligent as the next guy? In Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.’s story of Harrison Bergeron, handicaps, such as small radio’s that blast sharp sounds are used to prevent individuals from having more intellectual thoughts than others. The year is 2081 and everyone is equal in every which way. Handicapped George and his wife Hazel are watching a ballerina

Similar Essays

Humor In "Harrison Bergeron" Essay

908 words - 4 pages Kurt Vonnegut’s Harrison Bergeron is a short story about a futuristic version of the United States in which everyone is made equal through physical, emotional, and intellectual handicaps. The story focuses on two characters, George and Hazel Bergeron, who are sitting together and watching television. Hazel is described as being of “perfectly average intelligence”, while George is required by law to wear a device in his ear that transmits

Dehumanization In Kurt Vonnegut's "Harrison Bergeron."

746 words - 3 pages Dehumanization in Kurt Vonnegut's "Harrison Bergeron.""The year was 2081, and everybody was finally equal," the story begins. "They weren't only equal before God and the law. They were equal in every which way"(1354). In this haunting story, Vonnegut probably wanted to warn our society of similar kind of equality, equality that can be fatal for human race. In this work the theme is only a minor feature and is not really developed. The idea

Equality's Dark Side In In Kurt Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron

1443 words - 6 pages Equality's Dark Side in In Kurt Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron The goal of countless societies throughout human history has been to establish both complete freedom and absolute equality. However, this goal is, by its very nature, unachievable. These two ideal states cannot coexist in their most perfect forms. Also, the perfect forms of either freedom or equality represent total chaos or total oppression, respectively. In Kurt Vonnegut’s

Surveillance In Foucault's Panopticism And Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron

1800 words - 7 pages Surveillance in Foucault's Panopticism and Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron Ever feel as though someone is watching you? You know that you are the only one in a room, but for some reason you get an eerie feeling that you are not alone? You might not see anyone, but the eyes of a stranger could be gazing down on you. In Foucault's "Panopticism," a new paradigm of discipline is introduced, surveillance. No one dares to break the law, or do anything