Huxley's Happiness Essay

1103 words - 4 pages

Huxley's Happiness

In the eyes of Aldous Huxley, human happiness is very much different than the findings of Freud, the definition of dictionaries, or even that of the present public's opinion. To Huxley, happiness is like all human emotions; nearly uncontrollable, virtually indefinable, and more complex than anyone in our society would like to believe. Nevertheless, through the characters, societies and plot developments of Brave New World, Huxley's present audience can gather a vivid idea of his own personal definition of true happiness. This is pursuit by Huxley seemed in order to caution his readers about the risk of science's reign over life. In accordance, this is also pursued because of Huxley's underlying hope that scientists, politicians, and the general public, will heed his advice and think about their actions and the things they are, and will have to, sacrifice in order to be totally and completely clean and safe. This recognition of the audience can happen, but only after the audience identifies how and when Aldous Huxley utilizes his comparative style to expose the differences between joy and pleasure, science and nature, and most of all between individuality and conformity.

The characters and societies presented in Brave New World are written with an obvious contrastive style to rule out other definitions and thus better define his true happiness. The savage world and the civilized world presented in the novel give the audience a concise black and white choice between two clashing societies. This option is, at its base, a choice between a natural emotional joyfulness and a scientific physical pleasure. The civilized society thrives on cleanliness, consistency, mass production and consumption, and conformity. The savage reservation is nourished by religion, nature, individuality, heredity and history.

At the beginning of Brave New World the reader is lead through a series of imagined, yet realistic, scientific techniques used in the society to gain social stability. Through the grad school-esque lectures and explanations of social predestination, hypnopedia, and various other forms of conditioning Aldous' audience is given a detailed description of how the civilized world thinks and acts.

"Everybody is happy nowadays."(Huxley) is one of the crucial and standard moral implementation techniques used in the "brave new world", which appear throughout the novel. However every time this appears it is also followed by a character stating, acting, or thinking of his or her major life problems. Thus the statement is obviously a lie or at the least, a misconception of what is happiness.

Another excellent example of the contrasting reality to this society's way of thinking is

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