This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Frances Perkins And The Great Depression

2295 words - 10 pages

Part A-Plan of the Investigation
To what extent is Frances Perkins responsible for and involved in the economic and social policies during The Great Depression? Frances Perkins role in government through pre and post great depression is not as widely recognized as some her fellow cabinet members who also pushed the New Deal. The details of who was the driving force behind the New Deal have been skewed over the years. How did Frances Perkins influence the economic and social policies of the Great Depression? Do people only remember Perkins for being the first female cabinet member under Franklin D. Roosevelt or was she actually a visionary of her time. During the time of the New Deal and new government, involvement in economy and the welfare of its people was she a leader or just along for the ride.
Part B-Summary of Evidence
Frances Perkins attended the male high school of Worcester, went on in nineteen hundred-two to receive her undergraduate degree from Mount Holyoke College, and a Masters at Columbia where she studied sociology and economics (Severn 11). After finishing her education, Perkins moves to the state of New York to work for the government as a factory inspector (Mohr 32). In Albany she began to lobby for a bill that would limit a woman's workweek to fifty-four hours. Though met with great opposition, this cry for action got her noticed by Al Smith and Robert F. Wagner who she would work with closely later down the road (Severn 40). In defeat, she went to Manhattan and was an eyewitness to the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire on March 25, 1911. This inspired her to forerun on fire and working conditions regulations in New York, and was the “torch that lightened up the political scene,” in her favor. Having previous investigator experience and lobbyist, the New York Committee of Safety came to her through her job at the Consumers’ League asked her for help in investigating the fire, and soon offered her a job. Her dedication is noted, and she is promoted to the executive secretary of the New York Committee on Safety (Martin 104). There she, Alfred Smith, the governor of New York, and several others work together to create thirty new legislative pieces on fire safety and the working conditions of the state. Through the publicity of the fire, they were able to get the fifty-four hour bill passed and much more (Severn 50).
While working in New York, she meets Paul C. Wilson who whom she marries in nineteen-thirteen She took a step back from her work and spent it with her husband, but when his behavior becomes erratic he diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Frances has to take up the job of breadwinner for her family as her husband is incapacitated to work. Her relationships with her family may have suffered from the long work hours, but her dedication to her work soared (Downy 93).
In 1924, Al Smith, who was a serious contender for the Democratic nomination, and brought Perkins along to help in his campaign. In campaigning,...

Find Another Essay On Frances Perkins and the Great Depression

Capitalism and the Great Depression Essay

1202 words - 5 pages the people have control over their own market and reap the most benefits. Capitalism began to strive with the development of mass production, which was “the method of producing goods in large quantities at low cost per unit.”1 The economy was booming, and it appeared as if there was no end in sight. However, capitalism and mass production both have their downfalls, and both were witnessed in the 1930s in the form of the Great Depression. The Great

The Great Depression and the New Deal

2036 words - 8 pages History 130611/29/10The Great Depression and the New DealThe Great Depression and the New DealThe Great Depression can be defined as an "economic slump" in North America and other industrialized areas of the world. The Great Depression began in 1929, as a result of the drastic stock market crash on October 29 of that same year. It lasted until about 1939 and was said to be the "longest and most severe economic depression ever experienced by the

The Great Depression and the New Deal

988 words - 4 pages Great Depression The Great Depression and the New Deal In response to the Stock Market Crash of 1929 and the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt was ready for action unlike the previous President, Hubert Hoover. Hoover allowed the country to fall into a complete state of depression with his small concern of the major economic problems occurring. FDR began to show major and immediate improvements, with his outstanding actions

The Great Depression and The New Deal

2288 words - 9 pages The Great Depression and The New Deal The Great Depression first started as early as 1928, but did not affect the United States until 1929. The Great Stock Market crash started the event of the Depression here in America, but was not the main cause to why it happened. During the early stages of the

The Great Depression and the Dirty Thirties

1134 words - 5 pages There were many causes of the Great Depression (need help on the first sentence). Yes, the stock market crash was a main reason of the Depression, but it actually began long before that, with the Roaring 20’s. With such a large disparity between the rich and the poor, the overproduction of goods (too much too quickly), and people racing to buy stocks, it was only fitting that it would soon come to an end. Before it actually crashed, the stock

The classical model and the great depression

2084 words - 8 pages the country. People could hear things on the radio that resembled the way they felt about an issue. Not only did the radio cause our nation to come together, it also caused families to come together. Typical families had radios they would set near the fire, and listen to them every evening. Life was great...until the dramatic downfall of our economy known as the great depression. The great depression is remembered as the worst ten years our country

Federal Reserve System and the Great Depression

972 words - 4 pages FlemingJordan FlemingMr. Alex Blumenstock07 October 14ENGL 1010The Federal Reserve System and the Great DepressionThe Federal Reserve System impacted many major economic situations of the United States during the 20th and 21st centuries. One example of this impact occurred during the Great Depression of the 1930's. This paper will analyze how the Federal Reserve System stimulated the creation, continuation, and end of the Great Depression.The

Roosevelt Vs. Hoover and the Great Depression

1653 words - 7 pages Roosevelt and Hoover The Great Depression drastically changed America's definition of Liberalism. Prior to the onset of the depression, in the roaring twenties, policies of laissez-faire were considered liberal, radical, revolutionary, and even democratic. This was due to the fact that revolution was a horrifying notion and not until after the laissez-faire and the system of free market fails in the 1920's do people begin to look about for

The Great Depression and President Herbert Hoover

886 words - 4 pages -President’s election. (Insert cite) Instead of “using the power of the federal government to squarely address it” (I C), Hoover vetoed many bills that would help the situation, believing in volunteer help. Hoover soon became hated and thought of as heartless. Ex-President Herbert Hoovers involvement in the Great Depression had a great but tragic impact in history because of his lack of severity towards the situation, his many unsuccessful programs and

The Great Depression: causes and cures

648 words - 3 pages sudden economic crises that was the Great Depression. However, Franklin D. Roosevelt's plan to fix the nation that was the New Deal largely prevented the greatest problems contributing to the Depression, low money supply, unemployment and national panic regarding the banks.The New Deal included many plans of reform as well as associations to prevent and to fix the Great Depresiion. For example, one of the most direct, initial and biggest causes of

Down And Out In The Great Depression

1333 words - 5 pages During the 1920’s, America was a prosperous nation going through the “Big Boom” and loving every second of it. However, this fortune didn’t last long, because with the 1930’s came a period of serious economic recession, a period called the Great Depression. By 1933, a quarter of the nation’s workers (about 40 million) were without jobs. The weekly income rate dropped from $24.76 per week in 1929 to $16.65 per week in 1933 (McElvaine, 8). After

Similar Essays

The Great Depression And Policies Essay

655 words - 3 pages Following an era of economical prosperity, the Great Depression, otherwise known as the ugliest sister of the 1900’s family, which lasted an entire decade from 1929 to 1939, began on a fateful day with the New York Stock Exchange abruptly crashed and was unable to recover quickly. This occurrence, of course, had an unforgivable effect on the economy, leading to one of the most memorable and significant eras in American history. Not only

Roosevelt And The Great Depression Essay

1531 words - 6 pages Roosevelt and the Great Depression The Great Depression of the 1930’s was a great blow to America especially after the seeming prosperity of the twenties. The depression was a result not of false prosperity in the twenties, although the distribution of wealth was very uneven the affluence was very real, but rather from a lack of economic and political maturity to address the problems either before 1929 or as a cure post 1929. The Great

The Great Depression And Today Essay

1021 words - 4 pages Hardy PAGE \* MERGEFORMAT 1 Chris Hardy & Alex KhomyakovStewart History 8th CPFebruary 8, 2009The Great Depression and TodayThe economic downturn and the subsequent recession had many on Main Street wondering what happened. America was glued to the news as we watched our stock's become worthless and our government panic; we then looked out our windows and realized it was all too real. We saw our neighbor's homes foreclosed on, and the pain

Australia And The Great Depression Essay

698 words - 3 pages doubled to 20 percent by mid 1930. Reaching a later record devastating peak of 32 percent in mid 1932. The Great Depression affected Australia in many different ways. One being socially, it led people out of jobs which ultimately left families without homes. Many fathers left the households in search of jobs in the countryside and or become alcoholics. Many of the mothers cohabited with the male boarders with hope of financial support. Many sons