Ignorance In Juliuss Caesar Essay

1194 words - 5 pages

A person, who is ignorant, is a person who shows lack of knowledge. Ignorance is a lethal weapon for anyone to yield, because of their lack of knowledge him/her would be blissfully unaware of the danger ahead. In Julius Caesar, ignorance presented itself many characters. Although many key characters in Julius Caesar are in their own way all sensible, they all have the inability to take in their peer opinion, which displays their own that would eventually cause each of their own deaths.
The egotistical, arrogant Julius Caesar is seen to be showing great ignorance which caused his downfall in the form of betrayal. His character innately makes him weak because even though he suspected Cassius at the beginning, he did not take action upon his own suspicion. He also had many people telling him to beware the Ides of March, and to be careful of certain people. He did not listen to any of these warnings even though he had his own suspicion about one person who after all thought of the plan to kill Julius. If he was sensible and not ignorant, he would think that there would be people out there who would want to take him out. If he was not ignorant he would have at least asked someone to spy on Cassius just to make sure he was not up to anything bad. If he was not ignorant he would have heeded the many prophecies given to him by total strangers, because they were all relevant to one another but alas he was ignorant. A right-minded person would have considered all of these freak coincidence into account before going on with his/her plan, which Julius failed to do. In his final speech he said, “I could be well moved, if I were as you; If I could pray to move, prayers would move me; but I am constant as the northern star… Unshaked of motion; and that I am he, Let me a little show it, even in this” (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, III, i, 58). What Julius meant when he said this was that he was the most “constant” person in the universe. This means that once he made up his mind, you could not change it anymore. This quote proves that even though people were warning him about an upcoming danger he would have not done anything because he already decided he would not listen to them. That mindset did not allow him to listen to his peers’ opinions, which proved to be his downfall.
Cassius’ sign of ignorance is not as prevalent as Julius Caesar’s or Brutus. His ignorant disputes with Brutus, did not fare him well at the end. At the beginning of the play, Cassius is perceived as a manipulator. He tricks Brutus into joining his conspiracy to kill Julius Caesar by saying that Julius was going to destroy the Roman Republic when he becomes the ruler. He has many tactics to trick a person into agreeing with him, which goes well with his brilliant ability to deceive a person with his mouth. His signs of ignorance seem to be non-existent but when he does show, it is at the worst of times. He is a pushover when it comes down to talking to Brutus. He lets Brutus’ make the...

Find Another Essay On Ignorance in juliuss caesar

Julius Caesar and Napoleon Bonaparte Essay

2251 words - 9 pages Throughout the history Europe, kings and dictators have been notorious for their unquenchable thirst for power and complete domination; the lure of absolute supremacy and total allegiance was too tempting to disregard. Some made their way by the rights of birth, others by scheming their path through politics. But none are as infamous than that of Julius Caesar and Napoleon Bonaparte. Both Napoleon and Caesar achieved great glory by bringing...

Many Tragic Heroes and Societal Issues Found in Julius Caesar

3738 words - 15 pages Many Tragic Heroes and Societal Issues Found in Julius Caesar   William Shakespeare wrote Julius Caesar around 1599. The play is said to be an adaptation of the Greek account written by Plutarch. This account refers to the lives of Marcus Brutus, Julius Caesar, and Marcus Antonius. Julius Caesar touches on many societal issues, which are still voiced today: suicide, peer pressure, what it means to be a good leader, and assassination....

Comparison of Tragedies written by Miller and Aristotle

768 words - 3 pages For a story to be a tragedy it has to follow the principles setby Aristotle, a Greek philosopher, or those of Arthur Millerwho is a twentieth century playwright. A tragedy, in Aristotle'sview, usually concerns the fall of an individual whose character isgood but not perfect and his misfortunes are brought about by thetragic flaw. This...

Shakespeare: A Master of Tragedy, As Seen in Julius Caesar

1502 words - 6 pages Some of the world’s greatest and most recognized writers were and are masters of the tragedy. Though everybody enjoys a nice tragedy in a book or play once and again. One overwhelming in deaths and disasters would defiantly be a turnoff to many. However, a classic trait for many Shakespearian pieces would be rather high in these. One perfect example being his infamous play Julius Caesar. Jealousy, power and war, all of which being huge...

Cleopatra's Initial Encounter With Caesar

2608 words - 10 pages Cleopatra's Initial Encounter With Caesar Cleopatra is desperate-she needs to gain the throne of Egypt before her inadequate younger brother, Ptolemy, convinces Caesar to grant him full power. But alas, Cleopatra has been banished from Egypt by the ruthless Pothinus. Fortunately, the brilliant Cleopatra devises a plan to enter her Egyptian castle rolled up in a carpet, posing as a gift for the great Caesar. Her loyal servant, Apollodoros,...

The Aftermath of Carthage, the consequences of the defeat of Carthage on the Roman Empire

856 words - 3 pages The Aftermath of CarthageThe defeat of Carthage gave way to a new era in the Roman republic, characterised by numerous consequences. A great and worthy foe had been removed, however, to paraphrase Sallust, Rome was now entering a period of numerous disturbances, riots and civil war, namely because of the influence of a few powerful men who...

Justice and Warfare

749 words - 3 pages Warfare, like everything else in the City of the Sun, is a communal event. There is the division of leaders, with Power as the head and similarly leaders of smaller factions, such as the infantry, artillery, cavalry, and engineers. Those 12 and older, both boys and girls, are taught to fight in a variety of ways, with many weapons. Here again, like in...

Fahrenheit 451 And 1984 - The Fear Of Utopia

1248 words - 5 pages Several conflicting frames of mind have played defining roles in shaping humanity throughout the twentieth century. Philosophical optimism of a bright future held by humanity in general was taken advantage of by the promise of a better life through sacrifice of individuality to the state. In the books Brave New World, 1984, and Fahrenheit 451 clear opposition to these subtle entrapments was voiced in similarly convincing ways. They first all...

The Bad Emperors of Rome

1874 words - 7 pages Caring, respectable, valued and honoured are all traits desirable of an emperor. Augustus encompassed all of these and went as far as restoring the Republican government from its once fallen state, but this was all forgotten when Tiberius became emperor. Tiberius was corrupt by power and Rome began to live in an era of destruction. As well, the subsequent emperors, Caligula and Nero followed in the same path, portraying violence and negatively...

Dangers of a Divided Society in Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury

2161 words - 9 pages ‘Fahrenheit 451’, by Ray Bradbury, is a novel which invokes much thought about the way we live in society today. Through the protagonist, Guy Montag, Bradbury makes a wider point about the dangers that a divided society can present. In the novel, Bradbury creates a society in which all books and free thought are forbidden. It is clear to us that books are seen to be the source of all unhappiness and should therefore be prohibited. As a fireman,...

The Fate of The Blind. Interprets blindness in King Lear (by Shakepseare) and Oedipus

2022 words - 8 pages 'There's a divinity that shapes our ends, rough hew them how we will.' These words from Hamlet are echoed, even more pessimistically, in Shakespeare's later play, The Tragedy of King Lear where Gloucester says: 'Like flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods, they kill us for their sport'. In Lear, the characters are subjected to the various tragedies of life over and over...

Similar Essays

Julius Caesar's Responsibility For His Own Death In William Shakespeare's Play

1315 words - 5 pages Julius Caesar's Responsibility for His Own Death in William Shakespeare's Play William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' is a tale of a very ambitious roman who is betrayed by his nearest and dearest, not to mention most trusted, friends. Caesar, a famous military general had great hopes of one day becoming sole ruler of Rome,- but was prevented from doing so by his own death . Caesar was a great man,- brave and noble,- having...

Julius Caesar: Beware The Ides Of March

1092 words - 4 pages The Senate of the Roman Republic are the ruling power over most of the known world. Yet this powerful and influential senate is easily threatened by one man; Julius Caesar. To the senators Caesar is the catalyst for the downfall of a Republic they had worked so hard to create and protect. The playwright William Shakespeare dives into this world of betrayal and ambition with his play The Tragedy of Julius Caesar. Using his voice as a writer he...

Influential Leaders: Julius Caesar Vs. Mahatma Gandhi

697 words - 3 pages Influential Leaders: Julius Caesar vs. Mahatma Gandhi Julius Caesar and Mahatma Gandhi were both leaders from different countries and time periods. Based on the play, "Julius Caesar" by...

Julius Ceasar Essay

1283 words - 5 pages JULIUS CAESER 1.) The great philosopher Aristotle makes the distinction between comedy and tragedy. Aristotle defines tragedy as a tragic character falling from a high place in society due to a flaw they possess and provides an insight into human existence. He defines comedy as any story that begins in adversity and...