Imagery Usage In Shakespeare´S Julius Caesar

945 words - 4 pages

What comes to mind when one thinks of “Romans”? Power, dominion, or even greatness could describe these noble people. The Romans were arguably one of the most powerful civilizations in history, so how could a people of such greatness come to such ruin? Power is a dangerous privilege for any worldly nation to possess, and when mixed with a scandalous concoction of greed and corruption, could spell the end of an entire civilization. Julius Caesar showcases Shakespeare’s own interpretation concerning the demise of Rome’s most famous leader. This play spotlights various examples of imagery to help the audience understand the author’s interpretation of this historical tragedy. Imagery is a kind of figurative language used to help the reader interpret a story through sensory description. The themes of power and corruption are displayed through many examples of Imagery in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar such as the barrenness of Caesar’s wife, the offering of a crown, and a series of foreshadowing omens.

The first imagery device to consider can be found during a celebration of the Roman feast of Lupercal when Caesar asks Antony to “...touch Calpurnia; for our elders say, The barren, touched in this holy chase, Shake off their sterile curse.” (I, ii, 89) The imagery used in this passage is a little less obvious, so one must break down the quote to understand what is being said. It was part of Roman cultural tradition for a naked participant to run through the streets of the city during the festival. It was also believed that if this runner touched you, it was good luck. Caesar is asking Antony to touch Calpurnia because he believes that it will “shake off [her] sterile curse,” meaning that she is supposedly infertile, and a touch from Antony will cure this. It’s an interesting thought, but is this information really vital to the plot of the story? Why would Shakespeare include it if it’s not relevant? If one reads deeper into the meaning of this piece of imagery, one could see it’s meaning from different light. Caesar gives the blame to Calpurnia in order to provide an explanation as to why they are unable to bear children, but in reality the medicine did not exist to be able to prove this at the time. It could be that Caesar has become barren, not Calpurnia, which could create problems if Ceasar were to assume a throne; he would be unable to produce an heir. So what could one see under this new perspective? Perhaps Julius Caesar’s actions were directed to make himself king after all, and thus making him seem like a more power-hungry figure in the story. If Caesar was indeed seeking the throne as the conspirators claimed, wouldn’t it be important to him that he would have a...

Find Another Essay On Imagery Usage in Shakespeare´s Julius Caesar

The Power of Rhetoric in Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

1131 words - 5 pages In William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, persuasion and rhetoric play a crucial role in a myriad of events and outcomes that occur. In Act one Cassius is trying to convince Brutus to turn against Caesar and join the conspiracy. Later, in Act three, Brutus and Antony speak at Caesar’s funeral. Brutus convinces the Roman people that what he and the conspirators did was for the good of Rome. Antony then persuades the plebeians that the conspirators...

Who Is The Hero In Julius Caesar By Shakespeare?

382 words - 2 pages Julius Caesar. His name alone summons up feelings of heroism, bravery, and tragedy. American Heritage dictionary states that a tragic hero is any man noted for feat of courage or nobility of purpose: especially, one who has risked or sacrificed his life. As the writing prompt asks who is the actual hero out of the play? And further more, who was the hero in the real-life history of Julius Caesar and the Roman Empire?Several characters at first...

Analysis of Cassius in Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

1061 words - 4 pages Gaius Cassius Longinus, known as Cassius, is a very rational and manipulative person. He is controlling, greedy, and puts forth a lot of effort in the military. Cassius is a senator of Rome. He is a rebel at heart and also wants everything done his way. Cassius is known for "hears no music," which means that he is not evil, but could never be satisfied. Cassius is a different man to different people, depending on who it is he can be loving or...

The Tragedy Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

1189 words - 5 pages The Tragedy Julius Caesar is a play written by Shakespeare in 1599 that contains betrayal, deception, and exaggeration. The story revolves around the days before and after Caesar’s death. As you keep reading you see the various sides of the characters, who is truly murdering Caesar for Rome, and who is doing it for themselves. Brutus is doing it for Rome and its citizens because he feels Caesar isn’t fit for being king. While reading, it was...

"A Tragic Hero"-Julius Caesar William Shakespeare

726 words - 3 pages "A tragic hero, in literature, is a protagonist that is otherwise perfect except for a tragic flaw, that eventually brings him down in the end."(Wikipedia dictionary) Through out history, there have been tragic heroes in fiction and history. In history we can see this trough people such as people like Martin Luther King Jr. or John F. Kennedy. In the story Jack and the Bean stock, Jack gets some beans and plants them and climbs up the bean stock....

The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

1231 words - 5 pages In Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Brutus faces an internal conflict involving his best friend Caesar becoming the ruler of Rome. Brutus must decide whether to let Caesar live, knowing he would be a bad ruler for Rome, or whether he should kill him for the good of the people. Based on Brutus’ knowledge, his decision to kill Caesar was justified with reason, being innocently misled and manipulated, and the intention of doing what was...

Shakespeare Shift in Style in the Second Act of Julius Caesar

1037 words - 4 pages Close Reading of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar (2.2.114-161)      Act two of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar begins the detailed planning of Caesar’s assassination, which follows soon after in the third act. One particular passage of interest during this act is found in scene one. This particular passage deals with the conspirator’s justification of their motives for wanting to kill Caesar, as well as the fine-tuning of their...

Points shown about human nature in the play Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

598 words - 2 pages In the play Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, some points are shown about human nature in Ancient Rome between 100 BC to 44 BC. Two characters who particularly show this are Brutus and Cassius. Themes include power, loyalty, corruption and manipulation.Brutus is a close friend of Julius Caesar, and has his trust. "I love the name of honour more than I fear death." - Act 1 Scene 2. This shows that Brutus is an honourable and patriotic man, who...

Use of Ethos, Logos, and Pathos in Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

927 words - 4 pages Persuasion is a natural method many people use to influence a person's beliefs, attitudes, intentions, motivations, or behaviors in a situation. Many include, bribing parents to buy clothes to even lending someone money. Either way, people all over the world use words or phrases to convince or sway a person into believing them. Just as many people have used rhetorical appeals to persuade someone, Anthony also uses the rhetorical appeals;...

How Characters Help Portray Themes In The Play, Julius Caesar, By William Shakespeare

570 words - 3 pages In the play, Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare, the interaction of characters help reveal the themes promoted by the playwright. This is especially true in Act Three, Scene Two. The ability of powerful oratory is demonstrated. Another issue in this scene is corruption from power. Loyalty and the lack thereof, is illustracted as the crowd is shown to be fickle.Persuasive verbalism has the potential to alter the thoughts of the public. Both...

Rhetorical Analysis of Mark Antony in Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

965 words - 4 pages “Julius Caesar” by William Shakespeare is the story of the assassination of Julius Caesar. Two speeches were made after his death, one being by Mark Antony. He uses many rhetorical devices in this speech to counter the previous speech and persuade the crowd that the conspirators who killed Caesar were wrong. Rhetoric is the art of persuasion and these many devices strengthen this by making points and highlighting flaws. Antony uses many...

Similar Essays

The Republic In Shakespeare´S Julius Caesar

1467 words - 6 pages One of William Shakespeare’s most revered Roman plays and a tragedy that has stood alone in its place of magnificence in world literature, Julius Caesar is accredited to have been written in 1599. It portrays the 44 BC conspiracy against the Roman dictator Julius Caesar, his assassination and the defeat of the conspirators at the battle of Philippi. It is one among several plays written by Shakespeare that were based on true events from Roman...

Suicide In Julius Caesar, By William Shakespeare

1095 words - 4 pages Suicide has always been a common alternative action to get away from one’s problems in human history. Sometimes however, it is at times hard to decipher whether or not one’s suicide may be heroic or weak. In Ancient Rome, suicide was often considered an honorable and praiseworthy way to die, it was not until long after this time period that organized religions started considering suicide as a sin rather than an act of heroism. In the...

Shakespeare: A Master Of Tragedy, As Seen In Julius Caesar

1502 words - 6 pages Some of the world’s greatest and most recognized writers were and are masters of the tragedy. Though everybody enjoys a nice tragedy in a book or play once and again. One overwhelming in deaths and disasters would defiantly be a turnoff to many. However, a classic trait for many Shakespearian pieces would be rather high in these. One perfect example being his infamous play Julius Caesar. Jealousy, power and war, all of which being huge...

A Tragic Hero In Julius Caesar By William Shakespeare

811 words - 3 pages "You either die a hero or live long enough to see yourself become the villain", said by Aaron Eckhart (Harvey Dent) in the movie The Dark Knight, describes perfectly the theme of William Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar. Even more so, Harvey Dent's words show the characteristics of the tragic hero in the production, Marcus Brutus. Most would argue that his part in the assassination of Caesar would make him the antagonist, or villain, but...