This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, Plato, And Aristotle:Morals And Ethical Codes

1160 words - 5 pages

What is the appropriate action? It is a controversial question that is a focal point for moral and ethical codes. Morals and ethics is, of course, a subject that runs deep in the discussion of philosophy. People are faced with moral dilemmas everyday, which many times society decides without thoroughly exploring their options. Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, Plato, and Aristotle are philosophers that focus on the topic of ethics, yet all have different outlooks.Kant is considered a non-consequentiality, which means he feels the intentions motives, and good will is more important than the results or consequences of an action. The backbone of Kant's philosophy is the belief in the fundamental freedom of the individual. Kant did not indicate anarchy, but the idea of self-government and the creation and obedience of universal laws. He believed the moral value of an action is assessed not from the purpose of the action, but from the "maxim" from which the action springs. He defines a maxim as personal policy in the cause-effect framework. Kant said that a person should only act on these maxims that could be willed into universal laws. In order to create a universal law, the action must be done out of good will or a pure hearted motive. Kant felt that you cannot do something wrong from a right motive. A person should act because it is the right thing to do and for no other reason. In addition, the motive must be related when considering moral value. A person should not be given credit for committing a morally valuable act when they did it only for the reward. Kant even rejects unselfish motives because to act solely for the happiness of others suggest that if our actions did not always evoke happiness then we would have no obligation to do it.Kant focused more on the motives and intentions of an action to measure value, where Mill focuses more on the ultimate end of the action. Mill's principle states that an action is "right" in relation to how it promotes happiness. Mill felt that happiness is desirable enough by itself and everything else is desirable in relation to its production of happiness. Mill defines happiness as the production of happiness and the absence of pain. Unlike Kant's focus on the individual, Mill believed in considering the happiness of everyone that might be affected by the action. People should seek the greatest amount of happiness possible for all involved.Plato aims to give an account of the ethical life. Themes for example knowledge, the well-ordered life, and wisdom are connected into the discussion of ethical life, however, the principle of justice and the organization of the good life is the central topic of Plato's theories. Today we associate justice with the successful implementation and execution of political law. To the Ancient Greek's justice was used to describe the proper and correct method of living. Justice is harmony and was believed it could be achieved through learning. Plato first established that justice is...

Find Another Essay On Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, Plato, and Aristotle:Morals and Ethical Codes

Ethics: Ayn Rand and John Stuart Mill

1367 words - 6 pages Ethics is defined as the study of moral standards and how they affect conduct in a society or individual. With such a definition it is not wonder that the idea of what is ethically right or wrong can be interpreted differently depending on whose moral compass you use. Though there are many scholars to choose from I chose two very specific doctrines to evaluate for the purpose of this class. Ayn Rand and John Stuart Mill are two scholarly writers

Comparing Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill

4526 words - 18 pages originally issued in several languages, including an English version. According to Mark, the modern age is a dangerous age, an age in which we might be alienated from that individual independence in work and in mind which defines our humanity. Confronted by this crisis, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill offer the world diverging solutions: annihilate the existing world and march toward communism, or guard against the dangers of the existing world

John Stuart Mill: Representation's importance and pitfalls

1238 words - 5 pages For John S. Mill, representation is the best form of government. "The ideally best form of government is that in which the sovereignty, or supreme controlling power in the last resort, is vested in the entire aggregate of the community; every citizen not only having a voice in the exercise of that ultimate sovereignty, but being, at least occasionally, called on to take an actual part in the government, by the personal discharge of some public

Comparing John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau

2042 words - 8 pages Comparing John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau John Locke, John Stuart Mill, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau all dealt with the issue of political freedom within a society. John Locke's “The Second Treatise of Government”, Mill's “On Liberty”, and Rousseau’s “Discourse On The Origins of Inequality” are influential and compelling literary works which while outlining the conceptual framework of each thinker’s ideal state present

Utilitarianism and Morality in John Stuart Mill´s Essay

1190 words - 5 pages . Despite the lack of understanding, John Stuart Mill confidently believes that truths can still have meaning even if society struggles to understand its principles. Mill does an outstanding job at depicting morality and for that the entire essay is a masterpiece. His claims throughout the essay could not be any closer to the truth. Morals are an often talked about matter, but what is morality? Not everyone is instilled with the same morals

John Stuart Mill

1827 words - 7 pages Who is John Stuart Mill? John Stuart Mill was born on May 20, 1806, in London, England. He was mostly known for his radical views. For example, he preached sexual equality, divorce, universal suffrage, free speech, and proportional representation. He had many works of writings such as Principles of Political Economy, On Liberty, The Subjections of Women, and the Three Essays of Religion: Nature, the Utility of Religion, and Theism.  &nbsp

The utilitarian philosophies of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill

2070 words - 8 pages Compare and contrast the utilitarian philosophies of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill. Which do you think is the more convincing moral theory, and why?In terms of Utilitarianism, this assignment shall outline the philosophies of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill. It shall firstly illustrate the ideas of Bentham and then follow on to compare and contrast those of Mill. To continue, the assignment will view the failing qualities in both the

Immanuel Kant's Ethics Of Pure Duty and John Stuart Mill's Utilitarian Ethics Of Justice

2730 words - 11 pages Immanuel Kant's The Grounding For The Metaphysics of Morals and John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill are philosophers who addressed the issues of morality in terms of how moral traditions are formed. Immanuel Kant has presented one viewpoint in "The Grounding For The Metaphysics of Morals" that is founded on his belief that the worth of man is inherent in his ability to reason. John Stuart Mill holds another

Utilitarianism, by John Stuart Mill

2492 words - 10 pages principle of morality is and why it is so special. He explains that this “utility” concept is what he believes is the moral foundation and it is so central to our existence as human beings because it allows for achievement of happiness of people. Works Cited • Mill, John Stuart, and George Sher. Utilitarianism. 2nd ed. London: Hackett Publishing , 1895. Print. • Kant, Immanuel, and James W. Ellington. Grounding for the metaphysics of morals

John Stuart Mill Biographical Information

1400 words - 6 pages John Stuart Mill was a very intelligent man, who not only was a great economist of his time, but he was also a philosopher, scholar, author and a political scientist. He was the “most influential English-speaking philosopher of the 19th century.” (John Mill, 1) John made a huge impact on the world. He contributed many ideas and beliefs to society. John Mill was a man of many talents, and he had the courage to hold beliefs that most people did

John Stuart Mill on Liberty

2027 words - 8 pages to others", and some feel they are no actions that only affect the person, not others. Indeed many feel that Mill's theory raises as many questions as it answers. It is true that "harm to others" can be interrupted differently, however Mill knew of what he was talking and I believe he clearly defines this in the essay and that I have also explained it in this essay. Overall I believe that John Stuart Mill makes a very clear, coherent and

Similar Essays

Moral Actions By Philosophers Immanuel Kant And John Stuart Mill

1174 words - 5 pages In the making of my own argument on the elements that justify a right or wrong action, I will reference two of the most influential philosophers, Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. In order to make this paper easy to follow, I intend to focus on one of the arguments formed by each of these men. I will evaluate how both of Kant and Mill’s principles fits into the morals of right and wrong. Kant gives us a categorical imperative that urges one to

John Stuart Mill And Utilitarianism Essay

1586 words - 7 pages A major problem in society John Stuart Mill highlights is that there is not a set standard for judging what makes something right or wrong. Clearing these principles is one of the fundamental steps for consensus on moral thinking. Mill believes that what makes something right or wrong is based on whether it is thought of as “good”. However, this only further raises the question on what is considered good. Mill purposes the goodness as a

Popular Sovereignty:Aristotle,Plato,John Stuart Mill Essay

554 words - 2 pages individuals can do whatever they want as long as they are not harming others. Individuals are sovereign over their own body and mind. This is the harm principle as it relates to individuals.I feel this quote is a great way to sum up the thoughts of John Stuart Mill, "Pervasive confusion over the nature of government and freedom has opened the gates to perhaps the greatest, most widespread increase in political power history. If we are to regain and safeguard our liberty, we must re-examine the tenets of modern political thinking. We must reconsider the moral presumptions and prerogatives that have allowed some people to vastly expand their power over other people."

John Stuart Mill Life And Economics

571 words - 2 pages most elastic in its demand for goods. By this, John Stuart Mill was talking about the ratio of percent change in one country to another – the percent change being the increase or decrease in value of a good (in a percentage). The last two parts of this book were; the influence of the progress on society on production and distribution2 – that is, the way the development of a country affects its production and distribution – and, the