Immigrating To The United States Today

757 words - 3 pages

Every time that people are concerned with immigration, they will have to analyze a lot of disposed information to be familiarized with the reality of a fact that has played an important role through the American civilization. Sometimes the conjugation between immigration and prejudice is present in those researches, but is important to say that lately this conception will be modified for other called "American Dream." Is really America the better land to emigrate? Is it true that America is the land where others life will change? Is not easy to answer those questions, but it is a fact that will be discussed in this essay.

Historically United States has been a land of immigrants. From the Vikings, that crossed the Atlantic one thousand years ago looking for a place to conquer, until the recent immigrations of Latin American people who are looking for a new economic and social chance, America has been converted in the land of opportunities. In 1620, the Pilgrim Fathers (expelled by the Anglican Church) went abroad the "Mayflower" arriving in Plymouth, Massachusetts; that was the beginning of the first great immigration of modern time. People from different parts of Europe settled in the territory constructing a new society's idea of freedom, ownership and community. Religious persecutions, the interest to explore the New World or the searching of a better opportunity to live were, simply, the main reasons for which America began to be so populated. It is this way the "American Dream" began its history.

Immigration for a long time was considered as the principal resource to build the nation. People from everywhere became citizens of the country, which needed their force and creativity to construct the new homeland. However, the time was passing by to the moment where the country was so populated that the economy and the society did not tolerate the rise of the populace that mixed different races and cultures. This was the first breaking point in the primary ideology of the new born nation.

"`The American dream' is a reality; every person who comes here can make every dream true" - says an immigrant - "United States has given me great opportunities to have a better life." People who feel that America has been benevolent with them commonly answer these kinds of affirmations....

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